November 2016 Site of the Month

The Peer-Reviewed Instructional Materials Online (PRIMO) Committee of the Instruction Section of ACRL is pleased to announce that a new Site of the Month interview has been posted to our committee website.

November 2016 Site of the Month: Pima Community College Library Tutorials
Interview With: Sandra J. Ley and Rob Booth
Interviewer: Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra

Project Description: Pima Community College Library’s online, self-paced tutorials instruct students in academic-level research skills at point-of-need, without the limits of time or place. The tutorials educate and entertain researchers as they accompany an animated anthropology student on a research quest into the desert southwest. The tutorials’ setting reflects the unique landscape and history of Tucson, Arizona. Upon completion of the four tutorials, students are able to explore, select and focus a research topic, identify the nature and purpose of a variety of information resources, determine the extent of information needed, and effectively search the library catalog and article databases.

The full interview is available at: http://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/primo-peer-reviewed-instruction-materials-online/primo-site-of-the-month/november-2016-site-of-the-month/

To see the archive of previous Site of the Month interviews, please see http://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/primo-peer-reviewed-instruction-materials-online/primo-site-of-the-month/

Look for more interviews this fall!

Megan Hodge and Bill Marino
Co-chairs, ACRL IS PRIMO Committee

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Featured Teaching Librarian: Michael Stoepel

Several times a year, the ACRL Instruction Section Teaching Methods Committee selects and interviews a librarian who demonstrates a passion for teaching, innovation, and student learning. Nominate yourself or someone great!

Michael Stoepel of the American University of Paris

Michael Stoepel of the American University of Paris

Name: Michael Stoepel

Institution: American University of Paris – Library

Job Title: User Services Librarian

Number of Years Teaching: 6

What’s your favorite vacation place you have traveled to or where would you like to visit?

My next travel is to Spain – I hope. I want to visit Granada and Cordoba.

Where do you do your best thinking?

In the kitchen when I drink my coffee in the morning.

Describe your favorite teaching method (e.g. flipped classroom, problem-based learning).

My preferred way of teaching is active learning in the classroom as I believe that it is most effective. However, learning styles might differ and I try to adapt my teaching to it. PBL is a good way of engaging students, especially if you link your library sessions to assignments before students have to hand them in (“teachable moment”). I like the idea of the flipped classroom but yet, I have not found the best way of integrating it into my teaching. I am still experimenting.

This semester, I started using EasyGenerator to develop short tutorials for my class sessions. Either I use those tutorials to prepare my sessions or to follow up on them. However, I think that it is important to keep in mind how to integrate those tutorials into your teaching/student’s learning as they should not be stand-alone learning entities. So far, students have responded to the tutorials in a mixed way. Some of them found them “very informative” and “helpful”, others thought that they were “boring.” I like the idea of user design and I will try to use the feedback to improve the tutorials.

Describe a favorite activity that you use with students (this could be for a face-to-face class, online, or hybrid class).

One of my favorite active learning exercise is called “chalk talk.” I ask students to work in groups of 2, 3 or 4 and they have to write down their thoughts (i.e. find criteria for evaluating sources) on a sheet of paper (for two minutes). Students are not allowed to speak, only the “chalk talks.” Once, they are done with the chalk talk, I ask them to agree in their groups on one aspect that they have written down and to report back to the class (think-pair-share). I like the exercise because it activates students thinking in a quiet environment (for two minutes) before starting the classroom discussion.

Tell us how you assess your classes (e.g. mud cards, clickers, reflections).

I like the one-minute exit papers for the one shot sessions. For the FYE program, we conduct pre- and post-assessments even though I prefer qualitative assessment over quantitative assessment. Rubrics and formative assessment would be great to set up in courses but given the fact that we do not get the chance to intervene during the drafting of bibliographies, the application of rubrics is complicated. There is one Classroom Assessment Technique (CAT) that I like a lot – it is called RSQC2 (Recall, Summarize, Question, Connect, Comment).

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October 2016 Site of the Month

The Peer-Reviewed Instructional Materials Online (PRIMO) Committee of the Instruction Section of ACRL is pleased to announce that a new Site of the Month interview has been posted to our committee website.

October 2016 Site of the Month: Student2Scholar: Academic Literacies and Research Skills for Social Science Graduate Students
Interview with:  Cory Laverty (Queen’s University); Monique Flaccavento (University of Toronto); Elan Paulson (Western University)
Interviewer: Jennifer Sharkey

Project description: Student2Scholar (S2S) is a series of ten self-paced, interactive, online and openly available modules built on the Association of College & Research Libraries’ Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. S2S learning outcomes are designed to help students develop their critical thinking, organization, research, and communication skills, to enable them to participate more actively and confidently in their communities of research. Modules incorporate a range of motivational strategies such as badging, quizzes, self-reflections, an online research workbook and other interactives. A facilitators’ guide for instructors and librarians also enables integration of any or all modules into face-to-face, blended, or online learning scenarios.

The full interview is available at: http://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/primo-peer-reviewed-instruction-materials-online/primo-site-of-the-month/october-2016-site-of-the-month/

To see the archive of previous Site of the Month interviews, please see http://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/primo-peer-reviewed-instruction-materials-online/primo-site-of-the-month/

Look for more interviews this fall!

Megan Hodge and Bill Marino
Co-chairs, ACRL IS PRIMO Committee

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Featured Teaching Librarian: Caprice Roberson

Several times a year, the ACRL Instruction Section Teaching Methods Committee selects and interviews a librarian who demonstrates a passion for teaching, innovation, and student learning. Nominate yourself or someone great!

Caprice Roberson of College of Southern Nevada

Caprice Roberson of College of Southern Nevada

Name:  Caprice Roberson

Institution:  College of Southern Nevada

Job Title:  Instructional Services Librarian

Number of Years Teaching: 5

Why did you become a librarian?

I’ve worked in libraries since becoming a shelver at 16 years old. I loved being able to actually see how the work we do and the services we provide impact a person’s life.

What’s your favorite vacation place you have traveled to or where would you like to visit?

I loved visiting Barcelona, and I can’t wait to be able to go back!

Describe a favorite activity that you use with students:

I get to do one of my favorite in-person activities, an evaluation exercise, in a couple ENG 101 classes I am embedded in every semester. I adapted the activity from an article I read (apologies to the authors, I do not have the citation information).

I split the class into groups and show them a “bad” source—something I, as a librarian, would not use in academic-level research. I then ask them to tell me why they think I would not use it, which leads to a discussion on what we should look for when evaluating sources. I then take a research topic one of the students are working on, and we discuss as a class what we would find in the “perfect” source for that topic (who, what, where, when, why). The groups then each compete to try to find a source that fits our criteria as best as possible. Everyone presents their source, and we vote on a winner. We finish up with a discussion on how there is rarely a “perfect” source, and how they will have to decide for themselves whether or not a source is appropriate to use.

I do this exercise on my first class visit, before I get into the how and where of actually searching. I think this approach sets a good foundation for not just finding possibly relevant information, but critically thinking about it and its uses in their research.

Tell us how you assess your classes:

Working with the instruction team here at the library, I have spent the past couple years trying to figure out how to assess our one-shot instruction sessions in order to demonstrate our direct impact on student success. Currently, we are on our second iteration of a tool that is designed to measure whether students achieved the outcome for the session by asking them a couple of short questions. Librarians then grade responses against a shared rubric. It’s not perfect, and we are still working to improve the tool, but I am proud of the work we have done, and continue to do, towards assessing our impact on student success.

Describe your experience with instructional technologies:

A large part of my job is creating online learning objects, and I am a huge fan of Articulate Storyline. Here at CSN, our second largest campus is our online campus, meaning there are thousands of students we will never have the chance to see in person. A few of the librarians here, including myself, worked to put together our comprehensive, interactive online research tutorial, Research 101 (http://libguides.csn.edu/research-101/), made using Storyline, with LibGuides as our content management system. I am not a fan of creating or watching screencasts, so I love that Storyline allows me an interactive way to teach those students that I cannot see in person. I have customized many tutorials based on specific class and assignment requirements, with a personal avatar I frequently use. I appreciate that this technology makes it easier for us to connect with and teach students online.

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September 2016 Site of the Month

The Peer-Reviewed Instructional Materials Online (PRIMO) Committee of the Instruction Section of ACRL is pleased to announce that a new Site of the Month interview has been posted to our committee website.

September 2016 Site of the Month:  Information Literacy: Primary and Secondary Sources
Interview with:  Cynthia Lewis
Interviewer: Gabriel Duque

Project description: This interactive learning module takes students through the process of identifying the differences between primary and secondary sources.

The full interview is available at: http://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/primo-peer-reviewed-instruction-materials-online/primo-site-of-the-month/september-2016-site-of-the-month/

To see the archive of previous Site of the Month interviews, please see http://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/primo-peer-reviewed-instruction-materials-online/primo-site-of-the-month/

Look for more interviews this fall!

Megan Hodge and Bill Marino
Co-chairs, ACRL IS PRIMO Committee

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Call for Proposals: 2017 ALA Annual IS Preconference

 

framework2

Moving Beyond the “Framework Blues”: Teaching Information Literacy with a Social Justice Lens

The ACRL Instruction Section (IS) 2017 ALA Preconference Planning Committee invites you to share preconference program proposals for workshops about transitioning from the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, specifically through a social justice lens. ALA 2017 will be held June 22-27, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. ALA Preconferences will take place on June 23, 2016.

The transition from the ACRL Standards to the Framework is in full force, yet many academic librarians are unsure how to proceed with this new, unfamiliar document and feel daunted by the task. Moreover, with the push for critical information literacy and social justice-oriented instruction in academic librarianship, some librarians have critiqued the Framework for having liberal ideological underpinnings and assuming a universality that doesn’t account for historical difference or responsibility to the other. The Framework mentions power relations in some places, but these references and gestures towards critical information literacy are inconsistent. Many questions about teaching with the Framework remain. How can the Framework be used to teach critical information literacy fully and authentically? How is the Framework compatible with social justice-oriented instruction?

With these questions in mind, the Instruction Section invites proposals for workshops on transitioning to the Framework specifically with a social justice lens. Many different types of critical information literacy or instruction scenarios using the Framework could be addressed. For example,

  • Have you taught students about the marginalization of certain voices in academic discourse, and the privileging of academic discourse in general over other types of discourse, incorporating the frames Information Creation as a Process, Authority is Constructed and Contextual, or Scholarship as Conversation?
  • Have you taught students about information privilege, the injustices of digital divides, and the ways in which students might participate in the Open Access movement, incorporating the frames Information Has Value or Research as Inquiry?
  • Have you taught students about their own power, privilege, and oppression, using Scholarship as Conversation or Research as Inquiry, in ways that have helped them reflect on their roles in society and encouraged direct action or political participation?
  • Have you been able to use critical race theory, feminist epistemologies, or other contemporary critical approaches to teach some of these frames?

Workshops that address both the Framework and critical information literacy or social-justice oriented instruction will be considered. Workshop proposals may address the following:

  • Lesson planning, assignment or curriculum design
  • Assessment
  • Service learning, or problem-based learning
  • Discipline-specific instruction
  • Professional development opportunities for colleagues or other librarians
  • Critiques of the Framework from the perspective of critical information literacy
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Any additional aspects of teaching involving both the Framework and critical information literacy or social-justice oriented instruction

During the full-day preconference, participants will develop the skills to help them succeed in this transition to the Framework through a social justice lens by exploring the language of the Framework and reflecting upon the Framework’s compatibility with social justice themes through several hands-on activities. We welcome proposals in any of the following formats:

  • Facilitated roundtable discussions, 50 minutes
  • Interactive workshops, 50 minutes
  • Presentations, 20 minutes
  • Panels, 75 minutes (including time for questions)

Application Deadline: October 14, 2016

To submit a proposal, please use the online submission form. Submissions should be 500 words or less and include 2-3 learning outcomes.

The ACRL IS Preconference Committee will review all proposals  and applicants will be notified by November 4, 2016.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the IS Preconference Planning Committee chair, Robin Ewing rlewing@stcloudstate.edu.

We look forward to hearing from you!

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MENTORS NEEDED! DEADLINE EXTENDED! Join the ACRL/IS Mentoring Program!

 

Do you want to share your professional library instruction experience? Do you want to lead and build a relationship with a new colleague?  Please consider becoming a mentor for the 2016-2017 ACRL/IS Mentoring Program!

 

The purpose of the ACRL Instruction Section Mentoring Program is to contribute to the professional development of academic librarians who teach information literacy by pairing librarians experienced in teaching with librarians new to instruction or to the Instruction Section. Mentors should have a passion for instruction and experience in this field. Mentees will be librarians seeking to improve their instruction skills and knowledge and enthusiastically welcome your input and collegiality! In order to create mentor/mentee pairs by the beginning of the Fall Semester, we ask that you fill out our online application by September 20, 2016.

 

Applicants need to be members of ACRL and the Instruction Section to be eligible.
Mentor applicants, please use this form.

If you have questions about the ACRL Instruction Section Mentoring Program, please contact the Committee Chair, Bethany Herman (bethany.n.herman@gmail.com), or visit the IS Mentoring Program for more information.

Complete URL:

Mentor Application Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/11WYNrdgf7JBDEYFp42ir5HnJLyqtL4c7U_DyYSzlAgQ/viewform
IS Mentoring Program:http://acrl.ala.org/IS/is-committees-2/committees-task-forces/mentoring-program/

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Call for Proposals: 2017 ALA Midwinter Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum

The IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum is an excellent opportunity for instruction librarians to explore and discuss topics related to library instruction and information literacy. The steering committee welcomes proposals from individuals who are interested in convening this discussion online after the 2017 ALA Midwinter Meeting (mid-to-late January).

If you would like to share your knowledge, help your peers learn from one another, and spark a lively conversation, submit a proposal to lead the IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum today.

Application Deadline: October 24, 2016

To submit a proposal, please use the online submission form.

Applicants will be notified by November 4, 2016

To see examples of past discussion topics, view the digests of past discussions online.

Questions?
Contact the ACRL IS Discussion Group Steering Committee Chair, Kathy Magarrell (kathy-magarrell@uiowa.edu) or Vice-Chair, Patrick Wohlmut (pwohlmut@linfield.edu).

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Featured Teaching Librarian: Jon Hufford

Several times a year, the ACRL Instruction Section Teaching Methods Committee selects and interviews a librarian who demonstrates a passion for teaching, innovation, and student learning. Nominate yourself or someone great!

Photo of Jon Hufford

Jon Hufford of Texas Tech University

Name: Jon Hufford

Institution: Texas Tech University

Job Title: Librarian for the College of Engineering

Number of Years Teaching: ca. 35

What are you reading right now?

William Hazlitt’s essays

What’s your favorite “thinking” beverage?

Coffee

What class do you teach the most and how do you keep it fresh?

I especially like teaching two of our workshops, “How to Do a Literature Review” and “The Basics of Getting Your Research Published.” Our workshops are well attended by graduate students from all departments on campus. They are at the stage in their education where they want to get published or they need to know how to do a literature review for their thesis or dissertation. I’m doing a good bit of research, writing, and getting articles published, so this is one reason why I like these particular workshops.

Name two things you would share with a librarian who is new to teaching.

Be well prepared — know very well what you are going to cover and/or what you are expected to cover. Check out the equipment and tools you will be using in class half an hour before the class.

What’s your teaching philosophy?

Find the content you are teaching very interesting. Enjoy learning that content thoroughly and enjoy the process of learning it. Love teaching what you know to students. Believe that what you are teaching is very important for students to learn if they want to be educated and successful. Do your very best to give excellent classes.

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New Selected Resources

The ACRL Instruction Section Teaching Methods Committee has added new committee-recommended sources to their Selected Resources for Teaching Methods and Instructional Design in Library Instruction and their Selected Resources for Assessment in Library Instruction Lists.

The committee updates these lists with new resources and annotations annually. You can see the committee’s entire lists, including materials the committee curated as part of the “First-Year Experience and Academic Libraries: A Select Annotated Bibliography.” and the “Teaching and Learning Information Literacy Skills Textbooks” in Mendeley or Zotero.

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