POST: A Working Definition of Digital Humanities

Scott Weingart has compiled a collection of statements from digital humanities scholars in an attempt to come to “A Working Definition of Digital Humanities.” Spurred by a conversation on Twitter, Weingart sought out recommendations for courses that an aspiring (undergraduate) digital humanist should take. Responses from Ted Underwood, Johanna Drucker, Melissa Terras, John Walsh, and Matt Jockers are included. Weingart’s original request is reproduced below:

Dear all,

Some of you may have seen this tweet by Paige Morgan this morning, asking about what classes an undergraduate student should take hoping to pursue DH. I’ve emailed you, a random and diverse smattering of highly recognizable names associated with DH, in the hopes of getting a broader answer than we were able to generate through twitter alone.

I know you’re all extremely busy, so please excuse my unsolicited semi-mass email and no worries if you don’t get around to replying.

If you do reply, however, I’d love to get a list of undergraduate courses (traditional humanities or otherwise) that you believe was or would be instrumental to the research you do. My list, for example, would include historical methods, philosophy of science, linear algebra, statistics, programming, and web development. I’ll take the list of lists and write up a short blog post about them, because I believe it would be beneficial for many new students who are interested in pursuing DH in all its guises. I’d also welcome suggestions for other people and “schools of DH” I’m sure to have missed.

Many thanks,

dh+lib Review

This post was produced through a cooperation between Jennie Burroughs, Elizabeth Gushee, Rebekah Irwin, Elizabeth Lorang, Heather Martin, and Jeffrey Sabol (Editors-at-large for the week), Roxanne Shirazi (Editor for the week), and Zach Coble and Caro Pinto (dh+lib Review Editors).