POST: The Commons and the Common Good

In a post on her Planned Obsolescence blog, Kathleen Fitzpatrick (Michigan State University) reflects on a visit to the MLA, where she formerly served as Director of Scholarly Communication during the development of Humanities Commons. In the post Fitzpatrick considers common challenges for the future of such projects. A huge part of the problem is ...

POST: Mapping the Early Modern World: Using Google Maps in the Classroom

In a post on AHA Today, Julia M. Gossard (Utah State University) describes a mapping assignment for teaching about the Global Early Modern World. A mapping project such as this can address a number of learning objectives as well as challenges instructors face when teaching a survey history course. Instructors of survey courses in Western ...

POST: A Reflection on the Design for Diversity Forum

Ayoola White (Simmons College) has written a post on the Hack Library School blog regarding the recent Design 4 Diversity Forum, noting that the event was a welcome departure from the usual, “predictable” conversations around diversity in libraries. The two-day event, which took place Oct. 16-17 at Northeastern University and used the Twitter hashtag #d4d, ...

POST: Twitter’s Response to “The Digital Humanities Bust”

Digital Humanities Now has featured a twitter thread and hashtag that were created in response to, “The Digital Humanities Bust,” a provocative article that appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education on October 15 (premium access only). Instead of featuring a blog post as Editor’s Choice like usual, we have embedded the tweets below to ...

POST: Volunteers are helping Puerto Rico from home, with a map anyone can edit

PBS’s blog The Rundown has published a post on recent mapathons held at Columbia University, Boston University, Trinity College, Miami University, the University of Miami, Rutgers University and University of Nebraska Omaha. The events are designed to gather mapping data to help relief organizations find routes for aid. From the post: More than 1,500 roads ...

POST: Peer-Reviewing Digital Scholarship: A New Conference Leads the Way

The American Historical Association has published a post about the new Current Research in Digital Humanities (CRDH) conference, to be held on March 17, 2018, at George Mason University. Providing an avenue for peer review of digital scholarship, CRDH and its subsequent proceedings will broaden the scholarly conversation and “expand the possibility for who is able ...

POST: “Peer Review” is Younger Than You Think

Benjamin Schmidt (Northeastern University) has written a post examining the use of the term, “peer review,” noting that its relatively recent appearance in the scholarly record begs the question of what terminology could be used to describe “the new regime to come” as scholarship moves to digital forms. In “‘Peer review’ is younger than you ...

POST: Fragmentarium and the Burnt Anglo-Saxon Fragments

Andrew Dunning (British Library) has written a post for the Medieval Manuscripts blog discussing the launch of the international and inter-institutional project, Fragmentarium (“the Digital Research Laboratory for Medieval Manuscript Fragments”). Fragmentarium enables libraries, collectors, researchers and students to publish images of medieval manuscript fragments, allowing them to catalogue, describe, transcribe, assemble and re-use them. ...

POST: The East St. Louis Digital Humanities Club

Howard Rambsy II (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville), writing on the Cultural Front blog, introduces a new project and accompanying series of posts on “The East St. Louis Digital Humanities Club,” an after school digital humanities program for high school students. The program is part of the larger Digital East St. Louis project based at SIUE, ...

POST: Reginold Royston and Digital Humanities Research and Pedagogy

As part of their “Documenting DH” oral history series, UW-Madison’s Digital Humanities Research Network conducted an interview with Reginold Royston (University of Wisconsin–Madison), in which he discusses how everything we do and post online is subject to critical analysis, and that “there are limits to the ways that we can think about traditional database questions and how ...

POST: Using data from historic newspapers

Library of Congress’ blog The Signal features a post drawn from a talk by David Brunton (Library of Congress) on the need to simplify APIs. Brunton explains why complicated APIs are challenging for users, and offers his observations from his work on LoC’s Chronicling America project: But over time it has been my unscientific observation ...