Round-Up: Archival Futures, Neutrality and Speculative Knowledge Design

The texts of three provocative presentations relating to archival futures, current events, and digital libraries were shared online this week. While each of these texts in themselves merit individual attention, we thought that pulling them together might surface meaningful interconnections: “The Hubris of Neutrality in Archives,” by Samantha Winn (Virginia Tech). Delivered at the Mid-Atlantic ...

RECOMMENDED: Statement on US Administration Budget Proposal by DLF Leadership

Bethany Nowviskie (Digital Library Federation) has written a post on the new federal budget blueprint, published both on the Digital Library Federation site and her personal website. Nowviskie opens by describing the many agencies and offices “germane to the goals of the Digital Library Federation and its mission to ‘advance research, learning, social justice, and ...

RECOMMENDED: DLF Fellow Reflections

The Digital Library Federation has been publishing reports from its 2016 Fellows. This round-up covers posts reflecting on Fellows’ recent attendance at the DLF forum last November in Milwaukee. This week, Stacy Williams (USC) published a post reflecting on her experience on attending DLF 2016: I attended DLF 2016 for the first time during what ...

RECOMMENDED: Caring About Access

Tim Sherratt (University of Canberra) has posted the text of his portion of a panel discussion at Digital Directions 2016 in Canberra. Sherratt’s post begins with a reminder that: …we can’t take the meaning of words like ‘open’ or ‘access’ for granted. They are what we make of them. I’m a historian and hacker. I ...

RECOMMENDED: Speculative Collections

Bethany Nowviskie (Digital Library Federation) published the text of the talk she gave at the Harvard Symposium about the future of library collecting, “The Transformation of Academic Library Collection: A Symposium Inspired by Dan C. Hazen.” It is the sequel to her talk, “Alternate Futures, Usable Pasts,” featured in the Review last week. In this talk, entitled ...

RECOMMENDED: “What is an edition anyway?”

Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) has posted text and slides from her keynote at the Digital Scholarly Editions as Interfaces conference at the University of Graz. In her talk, “What is an edition anyway?” Porter offers a broader view of the conversation surrounding digital scholarly editions and their possibilities as interfaces. Electronic and digital editions ...

RECOMMENDED: Trans-ing History on the Web: The Digital Transgender Archive

In a post on AHA Today, Sadie Bergen (American Historical Association) discusses the Digital Transgender Archive (DTA) with K.J. Rawson (College of the Holy Cross, DTA). The DTA was established to enable researchers to locate and make use of transgender-related materials in digital and physical collections. The DTA, which continues to grow, currently contains some ...

RECOMMENDED: The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Ted Underwood

The latest installment of Melissa Dinsman‘s series on the digital humanities for the Los Angeles Review of Books is an interview with Ted Underwood (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). In the conversation, Underwood discusses his dislike of the term “digital humanities,” which he takes to simply indicate “a vague interest in technology,” and notes that ...

RECOMMENDED: Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016

Editors Matthew K. Gold (The Graduate Center, CUNY)  and Lauren F. Klein (Georgia Institute of Technology) have released the revised edition of Debates in the Digital Humanities.  Pairing full-length scholarly essays with shorter pieces drawn from scholarly blogs and conference presentations, as well as commissioned interviews and position statements, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016 reveals a ...

RECOMMENDED: Hacking heritage: power and participation in digital cultural collections

Tim Sherratt (University of Canberra) published a post on his Discontents blog entitled “Hacking heritage: power and participation in digital cultural collections,” detailing a project he shared at the DigitalGLAM Symposium on July 15 2016 in Melbourne.  In order to make the Pre-1980 materials in the Australian Government’s ParlInfo Database more readable and usable, Sherratt quickly developed a tool, Historic ...

RECOMMENDED: Searching for a Blazing World

In “Searching for a Blazing World,” Sarah Werner (@wynkenhimself) reflects on her recent plenary address at the Rare Books and Manuscript Section (RBMS) annual conference and revisits the issue of digital access to special collections. In the talk, Werner questioned how and why libraries decide what to digitize, and discussed the difficulties of locating and ...