RECOMMENDED: “What is an edition anyway?”

Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) has posted text and slides from her keynote at the Digital Scholarly Editions as Interfaces conference at the University of Graz. In her talk, “What is an edition anyway?” Porter offers a broader view of the conversation surrounding digital scholarly editions and their possibilities as interfaces. Electronic and digital editions ...

RECOMMENDED: Trans-ing History on the Web: The Digital Transgender Archive

In a post on AHA Today, Sadie Bergen (American Historical Association) discusses the Digital Transgender Archive (DTA) with K.J. Rawson (College of the Holy Cross, DTA). The DTA was established to enable researchers to locate and make use of transgender-related materials in digital and physical collections. The DTA, which continues to grow, currently contains some ...

RECOMMENDED: The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Ted Underwood

The latest installment of Melissa Dinsman‘s series on the digital humanities for the Los Angeles Review of Books is an interview with Ted Underwood (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). In the conversation, Underwood discusses his dislike of the term “digital humanities,” which he takes to simply indicate “a vague interest in technology,” and notes that ...

RECOMMENDED: Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016

Editors Matthew K. Gold (The Graduate Center, CUNY)  and Lauren F. Klein (Georgia Institute of Technology) have released the revised edition of Debates in the Digital Humanities.  Pairing full-length scholarly essays with shorter pieces drawn from scholarly blogs and conference presentations, as well as commissioned interviews and position statements, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016 reveals a ...

RECOMMENDED: Hacking heritage: power and participation in digital cultural collections

Tim Sherratt (University of Canberra) published a post on his Discontents blog entitled “Hacking heritage: power and participation in digital cultural collections,” detailing a project he shared at the DigitalGLAM Symposium on July 15 2016 in Melbourne.  In order to make the Pre-1980 materials in the Australian Government’s ParlInfo Database more readable and usable, Sherratt quickly developed a tool, Historic ...

RECOMMENDED: Searching for a Blazing World

In “Searching for a Blazing World,” Sarah Werner (@wynkenhimself) reflects on her recent plenary address at the Rare Books and Manuscript Section (RBMS) annual conference and revisits the issue of digital access to special collections. In the talk, Werner questioned how and why libraries decide what to digitize, and discussed the difficulties of locating and ...

RECOMMENDED: Must Digital Divide?

In her latest Library Babel Fish column for Inside Higher Ed, Barbara Fister (Gustavus Adolphus College) reflects on the recent Oberlin Digital Scholarship Conference. Her observations about digital pedagogy and the ways in which libraries and archives are, might, and ought to be involved in digital scholarship will be of use to librarians and archivists ...

RECOMMENDED: #PulseOrlandoSyllabus, #CharlestonSyllabus, and the public good

The Digital Library Federation (DLF) has posted a spotlight item, “#PulseOrlandoSyllabus, #CharlestonSyllabus, and the public good,” discussing the collective syllabus building movements that have followed in the wake of public tragedies and inviting editorial contributions to #PulseOrlandoSyllabus. We are heartened by the rapid response on the part of many in the digital library community to do what ...

ROUND-UP: Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of Digital Humanities (and Responses)

Daniel Allington (University of the West of England), Sarah Brouillette (Carleton University) and David Golumbia (Virginia Commonwealth University) published “Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of Digital Humanities” in the Los Angeles Review of Books, arguing that the digital humanities have “played a leading role in the corporatist restructuring of the humanities.” Positioning DH ...

RECOMMENDED: Everywhere, Every When

Bethany Nowviskie (Digital Library Federation) has shared the text of a talk given at Columbia University’s Insuetude symposium, which brought together scholars in archaeology and media archaeology to examine how the past is “made present both in and through its traces.” Among her comments in “Everywhere, Every When,” Nowviskie asks, “What would it mean to ...

RECOMMENDED: Implications of Archival Labor

Stacie Williams (University of Kentucky) published a post in Medium’s On Archivy this week, “Implications of Archival Labor,” building upon the “Leading Together: Archivists and Historians Shaping the Digital Archive” panel discussion from the Organization of American Historians’ 2016 annual conference. Williams’ post delves into the often hidden labor that goes into making archival collections ...