Chapter

Recommendations

After articulating these intersections and exploring responses that will help make libraries resilient in the face of the changing scholarly information environment, we identified the following objectives and actions in alignment with the responses discussed in the paper. In some cases, we suggest organizations best suited to forward these ideas, and in all cases, we encourage further conversations about all of them. These are far from the only possibilities, so encourage your libraries, committees, and organizations to build upon and add to these.

1.) Integrate pedagogy and scholarly communication into educational programs for librarians to achieve the ideal of information fluency.

a) Develop specific opportunities with the ACRL scholarly communication workshop and the Information Literacy Immersion Institute with a special emphasis on teaching about scholarly communication issues, including open access, author rights, copyright, and fair use. Key organizations: ACRL, ARL, and other academic library professional development organizations.

b) Explore and develop model instruction that integrates topics such as authorship, ownership, and use of content, from the first year seminar through graduate student workshops. Encourage all librarians to take advantage of opportunities to develop teaching and outreach practices and skills. Key organizations: individual library leadership.

2.) Develop new model information literacy curricula, incorporating evolutions in pedagogy and scholarly communication issues.

a) Redesign information literacy curricula to include topics such as authorship, ownership, and use of content, from the first year seminar through graduate student workshops. Key organizations: ACRL, individual libraries.

b) Support the review and revision of Standard Five of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education with the goal of strengthening the standards, performance indicators, and outcomes for scholarly communication issues. Key organizations: ACRL, individual libraries.

3.) Explore options for organizational change.

a) Seek out and share organizational models that break down barriers between information literacy and scholarly communication programs and librarians in order to strengthen our response to the changing needs of students and faculty. Key organizations: individual library leadership.

b) Offer support for exposure and training in the best practices in teaching so these are made available to all librarians, whether assigned scholarly communication or information literacy as their major role. Key organizations: individual library leadership.

4.) Promote advocacy

a) Engage at all levels of our organizations and institutions in discussions of the values held by scholars and librarians for broad dissemination of scholarship and student learning to become scholars. Key organizations: ACRL, other academic library organizations, individual library leadership.

b) Articulate the value librarians bring to the academic enterprise and the individual when we forge deeper collaborations around the intersections of information literacy and scholarly communication. Key organizations: ACRL, other academic library organizations, individual library leadership.

 

1 Comments ↓

One Response to “Recommendations”

  1. As a graduate of the program track of the Immersion Institute, 2012 I applaud the work of this Working Group to highlight these important intersections between IL and SC and to recommend integrating SC into the Immersion Institute curricula. Although SC was a key part of my action plan when I completed the program for which my cohort advisor provided excellent support and guidance, I would have benefitted greatly by a deeper recognition and exploration of these critical connections in the program track content during that week. My focus since my return has been to lead on SC while balancing my IL/ instruction responsibilities – all the while infusing one with the other to create new collaborations and expand existing ones across campus. This white paper comes at a time it is most needed and welcomed. It provides an excellent blueprint for those of us working across these “disciplines”. Thank you!