Post 5: Performance Indicators for Principles 5 through 9

What follows below are the last five Principles with their related Performance Indicators. Please keep in mind that these are intended to be expectations – standards – which apply to all types of higher education libraries.  Nonetheless, each library must respond to its unique user population and institutional environment.

The 2011 Standards assume that each library will identify and select Performance Indicators that are congruent with its institution’s mission and contribute to institutional effectiveness. A library may decide to create additional Performance Indicators that apply to its specific library type. For example, a research library may want to add a Performance Indicator around open access, while a Performance Indicator concerning GED support might be appropriate for a community college.

Text: Principles 5 – 9 (PDF)

Are there Performance Indicators, generally applicable to all types of higher education libraries, which should be added to what’s above? Is the relationship between the Principles and the Performance Indicators clear and intuitive?

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One Response to Post 5: Performance Indicators for Principles 5 through 9

  1. Tim Richards says:

    6.1 Perhaps the term “intuitive navigation” has meaning for others. I don’t know what this means.

    6.4 This could be a slippery slope.What does it mean to “promote” programs, exhibits and lectures? Publicize? Encourage? Some libraries have the resources to offer and conduct programs, exhibits and lectures but others do not.

    I understand “promote” to be different from “offer” — what does this indicator intend?

    9. External Relations: “Libraries engage the campus and the broader community through multiple strategies in order to advocate, educate, and promote their value.”
    I think this is the wrong focus –the focus, in my opinion, should be to engage the campus and the broader community to further the mission of the institution of which the library is a part. We demonstrate our value when we do this. The focus should not be on promoting the value of libraries by external relations, rather we demonstrate our value when we engage the campus and the broader community in constructive ways.

    9.1 I think that it is very misguided to include “donor cultivation and stewardship ” when speaking of external relations as you define it.

    Certainly, donor cultivation and stewardship is important. It seems to me it is part of Management/Administration in that donor cultivation and stewardship is linked to building and sustaining a resource base. I’d look for a way to incorporate this in 7.3 or 7.4, or add another indicator in 7. Management/Administration