The Internet of Things meets the Library of Things

If the New York Times article The Internet Gets Physical is any indication, a sea change is approaching in just how smart everyday appliances are going to become. In theory, smart infrastructure will connect you and any appliance with an IP address to everything else.

For example: your car will talk to your phone. Appliances like your computer, and chair, and desk, interact over the web. Data will be passed via standard web technologies from every Internet-capable appliance. Everyday consumer electronics will be de facto networked to the Internet. The overall effect of these smart objects means the possibility of new library services and research environments.

According to the New Media Consortium’s 2012 Horizon Reportthe Internet of things is made possible by the IPV6 initiative, which essentially allows for the explosion of IP addresses across the globe and in your everyday life:

“with the advent of the New Internet Protocol, version six, those objects can now have an IP address, enabling their information store to be accessed in the same way a webcam might be, allowing real-time access to that information from anywhere… the implications are not yet clear, but it is evident that hundreds of billions of devices — from delicate lab equipment to refrigerators to next-generation home security systems — will soon be designed to take advantage of such connections…” (p.8)

What are the implications of the physical Internet in library settings?

Your smart phone interacts with the library building

The ways in which mobile apps can interact with the library building is not yet fully realized; for example, should your phone and the building be able to tell you things such as the interrelations among your physical presence and searches you’ve done on your home or office computer – or places you’ve driven past in your commute; or where you spend you leisure hours? Who makes the choices of suggesting resources to you based on the information in all of your life-sensors? Surely libraries will need filtering algorithms to control for allowable data referencing but where and how will we implement such recommender services?

Smart digital shelving units

What if a future digital shelf arrangement could be responsive to your personal preferences? For example – the library building’s digital smart infrastructure could respond to your circulation history or Internet searches in a way that shelves could promote content to you in real time. What would this recommendation look like for individual research, study, or browsing? And how would libraries be able to leverage such a service?

Digital library integration with physical objects

Smart objects allow libraries to consider how to make the virtual presence (databases, e-books, ILS data) physical. Many libraries would welcome a more physical instantiation of vended software products, since to a certain extent, users believe the library’s collection consists of only the things that they can see in the library.

The 2012 NMC Horizon Report indicates that smart objects are on the far term horizon. So it may be four to five years before they affect higher eduction — what is your plan for smart objects in the library environment?

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One Comment on “The Internet of Things meets the Library of Things”

  1. [...] + Futurecasting (I hate that word) on how the Internet of Things could be utilized in libraries. [...]


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