Home » Distance Library Instruction Virtual Poster Session (Spring 2019) » Commercials For Faculty: Randall Library’s New “Databasics” Series

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Commercials For Faculty: Randall Library’s New “Databasics” Series

This poster is part of the Distance Library Instruction Virtual Poster Session hosted by the ACRL DLS Instruction Committee. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster! Authors will respond to comments between April 1-5.

Presenter:

Tammy Ivins, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Poster Description:

“Databasics” is a new series of 30-60 second commercials aimed at UNCW faculty. Instead of being detailed or comprehensive tutorials, these short commercials instead quickly market new or underused database features.

Poster:

(Click play to view Prezi. Prezi may not work with Internet Explorer.)

About the Presenter

Tammy Ivins got her BA from Davidson College in 2007, and MSLS from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2011. She has taught several fully-online credit bearing classes. Her research interests include conflict management, instructional technology, and librarian scholarship. She is a Hufflepuff.


18 Comments

  1. Since Prezi is non-ADA-compliant, here is a link to plain text for anyone using a screenreader: tinyurl.com/ivins-acrl19

    • Hello Tammy, I appreciate this alternate link. However, still experiencing difficulty seeing this poster board.

      -Linda

  2. I love the idea of a “Databasics” series—for students as well as faculty. The small scope/short length makes it seem easily “doable.” How do you choose which feature to highlight or determine what is underused?

    • Hi Elizabeth. Great question! So far, I am beeing chosing what to highlight based on features or holdings in our databases that I identify as largely unique. I’ve used vender materials and comments I’ve heard from fellow librarians in the past. I’m working on growing liason librarian buyin and have slowly started getting recommendations from them about what resources or features they feel aren’t being used as much as they should by their departments… i’ve been able to make a list of such recommendations and will start making those videos after I get back from the ACRL conference

  3. Thank you for sharing! Do you have a link to all of your Databasics videos somewhere so we can see them? Thank you also for including the “How”, as I found that very practical advise useful!

  4. Tammy, thank you for sharing your “Databasics” series! I have been thinking of ways to better reach out to faculty and inform them about discipline-specific resources we have available in the library. Have you gotten any feedback from faculty about the videos? Do they find them useful? Can you tell if there is any increased engagement with the resources you featured in the videos?

    • Hi Tonya, great question! Unfortunately, Hurricane Florence caused us a lot of trouble last Fall semester (I recently did a 30 min virrtual conference presentation about, if you are curious: https://sas.elluminate.com/drtbl?sid=2008350&suid=D.0ADE7E4C8B70D0AD9CD8EDA56FB0AD ), so I wasn’t able to launch this series then, as originally planned. Since we just launched it this semester, we haven’t had long enough for much feedback to get back from the faculty. Feedback from out librarians is good, as they feel like this is a nice alternative to boring ole’ emails, and that the faculty like them. But we haven’t had the chance to really, systematically check in with the faculty at the end of the semester and see how they liked this. That’s the next project, along with adding these videos to the database info pages on our website.

  5. I love this idea. The way you have packaged everything for user friendliness for anyone creating these commercials is really nice/useful.

  6. Hi Tammy-

    Thanks for sharing your videos. I love that they focus on one feature, are very short, and don’t have a librarian voice “telling”.

    LibGuides, text-heavy how-to’s, or even 3-5 minute librarian show and tell videos just don’t seem to resonate with our online students (or even f2f students), because they don’t have the time or the mental bandwidth to read or watch them.. I can see both students and faculty loving these though.

    Did you do research that informed your use of images or length of videos? As I said above, I used to keep videos to a 5 minute max, but in the last year or two, even 2-3 minutes seems too long for students. Thirty seconds does seem ideal.

    Do you find that faculty share these videos with their students? If they do, do you get follow ups from students mentioning the videos or asking for additional guidance for using these specific features of the databases?

    Best, Jenni

    • Hi Jenni,

      I’m glad that these sound interesting to you. I didn’t do much research, except to look at best some best practices for commercials and advertising (which included a short length, punchy images, setting a tone through music, etc). In our library, I’m trying to draw a clear line for the other librarians, trying to think of these as “commercials” rather than “tutorials.” Commercials and tutorials have very different goals. Tutorials are meant to teach expertise, while commercials are meant to give a taste and get ’em hooked. So, tutorial and instructional design best practices weren’t really my focus (outside of ensuring accessibility).

      Regarding faculty feedback: great question! Unfortunately, Hurricane Florence caused us a lot of trouble last Fall semester (I recently did a 30 min virtual conference presentation about, if you are curious: https://sas.elluminate.com/drtbl?sid=2008350&suid=D.0ADE7E4C8B70D0AD9CD8EDA56FB0AD ), so I wasn’t able to launch this series then, as originally planned. Since we just launched it this semester, we haven’t had long enough for much feedback to get back from the faculty. Feedback from out librarians is good, as they feel like this is a nice alternative to boring ole’ emails, and that the faculty like them. But we haven’t had the chance to really, systematically check in with the faculty at the end of the semester and see how they liked this. That’s the next project, along with adding these videos to the database info pages on our website.

  7. Hi Tammy,
    These are terrific! We want to try and do something similar at our library. Do you have any tips for getting started and would you be willing to share your template? Or show some screenshots of it?
    Thanks!

    • Hi Star, I’m glad that these seem interesting, and I’d be excited to see what your library comes up with! I think this idea could be taken even further and more fun (my original idea was to do a dramatic, movie-trailer voice over. Eg: “In world where there is google, one database arises to help you find the government information you need….”).

      One thing I didn’t mention in the poster is that the music came from YouTube’s outstanding free music library: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music. I use it for almost all of my videos. You can even filter by “mood;” I like bright, happy, and calm the best.

      I can definitely share my template if you are interested, though you’d need Camtasia to use it. If you have Camtasia, just respond or message me (ivinst at uncw.edu) with what Camtasia version, and I’ll email you the template package.

    • Hi Lorelei, absolutely! You can email me at ivinst @ uncw.edu, and I can send it to you. You will need to have the vidoe editing software “Camtasia.’ (do let me know when you email me if you have a version older than Camtasia 9… I think that I need to save it differently to be usable with older versions).

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