Home » Distance Library Instruction Virtual Poster Session (Spring 2019) » Capturing Student Discovery and Reflection in an Online Course

Calendar

No upcoming events at this time.

Archives

ACRL DLS Chair: Natalie Haber
Vice-Chair: Amanda Ziegler
Secretary: Stephanie Espinoza Villamor
Archivist: Andrea Hebert
Webmasters: Katie Stewart and Matthew Stevons (dlswebcontact@gmail.com)

Capturing Student Discovery and Reflection in an Online Course

This poster is part of the Distance Library Instruction Virtual Poster Session hosted by the ACRL DLS Instruction Committee. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster! Authors will respond to comments between April 1-5.

Presenter:

Lisa Campbell, University of Florida

Poster Description:

This digital poster will illustrate how I incorporated screen recording assignments into an online library and internet research course to engage students, promote critical reflection, inform my teaching, and assess student learning.

Poster:

About the Presenter

Lisa Campbell is the Instruction and Outreach Librarian at the University of Florida. In this role, she strives to create inclusive learning experiences that engage students and develop information literacy. She’s interested in active learning, instructional design, and thinking creatively to enable learning.


19 Comments

  1. I think this is a very cool idea, but I often hesitate when I see that an activity or assignment that requires the use of a third party tool. Did you find that students were comfortable using Screencastify? Did you receive any push back from students?

    Additionally, are you the primary instructor for the course or is this a one off activity? What was the next step after students turned in their screencasts? Do you have a copy of the actual assignment you could share?

    Sorry for all the questions! I really love this assignment idea and would love to hear more.

    • Hi Elizabeth! Thank you for your interest in my poster!

      I chose Screencastify based on their Privacy Policy (screencastify.com/privacy/) and their iKeepSafe COPPA and FERPA certifications. I’ve added a link to privacy policy in the syllabus and the following language: “These technologies foster collaboration and develop digital literacy skills. If you are not able to use these programs due to accessibility or privacy concerns please contact me to discuss alternative options for your assignments.” Based solely on their videos, I get a sense that students are comfortable using the Screencastify program, but I have not asked them. I think I will add that question to the reflection at the end of the semester!

      I am the primary instructor, but I think this could work as an embedded librarian. It’s really so fascinating to see their approaches to searching before providing instruction. After the students turned in the screencasts, I provided a screencast response with various ways to search strategically. I don’t yet have a public way to share the assignment, but I will try to get one to you soon.

  2. I love this idea! What were your instructions to students? In particular, I’m curious if you encouraged them to record their first try, “mistakes” and all. I know that when I was a student and had to record my searches (through written reflections, not screencasts), I only recorded the “successes”. Now that I’m a librarian, I’ve been trying to teach students that searching is an iterative process with lots of trial and error, and that the errors are important and still represent progress! It’s not about finding the perfect search string that gets you the perfect results on the first try.

    • Hi Jennifer, thank you!

      I included the following in the directions:

      2. Talk out loud through each step as you search and explain why you are taking this approach/using these strategies. There are several ways to locate this article, so just submit your personal approach (there’s no “right” answer).

      I wasn’t as concerned with the first attempt as I was in their personal approach, so some students searched a head of time ( I could see the previously clicked on links), while others clearly were giving it a try for the first time (lots of “hmms”).

      I also chose to use an open access article that could be found via Google, Google Scholar, and the library databases. I think this led to more genuine insights. If it was an article that could only be found via the library databases, I expect I would not get the initial searches through Google. However, it would be interesting to use an article that is not found through Google in order to reinforce some further digging. I showed students all three methods in my response video.

  3. This is a really great and exciting idea! I have some of the same questions as others and I’m looking forward to hearing more about how you implemented this.

  4. Interesting content and approach to promoting student engagement and analyzing student research behavior. Curious if Screencastify provides any analytics of research behavior……
    Nice work Lisa.

    • Thank you Evie!

      According to Screencastify, for stuents, “Screencastify does not host nor have any access to your videos” and “We do not advertise to or track student behavior, or sell any user data.” This data privacy is why I chose this program.

      I was able to get IRB approval and informed consent from students so I am planning to code this data myself (with a couple partners) and hopefully find some valuable insights that I can share!

  5. Hi Elizabeth! Thank you for your interest in my poster!

    I chose Screencastify based on their Privacy Policy (screencastify.com/privacy/) and their iKeepSafe COPPA and FERPA certifications. I’ve added a link to privacy policy in the syllabus and the following language: “These technologies foster collaboration and develop digital literacy skills. If you are not able to use these programs due to accessibility or privacy concerns please contact me to discuss alternative options for your assignments.” Based solely on their videos, I get a sense that students are comfortable using the Screencastify program, but I have not asked them. I think I will add that question to the reflection at the end of the semester!

    I am the primary instructor, but I think this could work as an embedded librarian. It’s really so fascinating to see their approaches to searching before providing instruction. After the students turned in the screencasts, I provided a screencast response with various ways to search strategically. I don’t yet have a public way to share the assignment, but I will try to get one to you soon.

  6. HI Lisa-

    Thanks for sharing this tool and how you’ve used it with your students.

    Thank you for including this language, “These technologies foster collaboration and develop digital literacy skills. If you are not able to use these programs due to accessibility or privacy concerns please contact me to discuss alternative options for your assignments.” I may be adopting that for some of my instruction!

    Did you find any students using this with their mobile devices? I still don’t know how it is done, but many students do so much work on their phones and not on a laptop or desktop, so I’m wondering if you got feedback from students who used mobile devices?

    Also, how many students did end up contacting you to discuss alternative options. And if you can share some issues those students had? We have a large adult learner population, and many of them have many difficulties with technology, even to the point of working in the LMS.

    Best, Jenni CityU of Seattle

    • Hi Jenni,

      Thanks for your comments! Yes, please feel free to use this language in your course! I think it’s important that students know there are options and that we respect their privacy. I didn’t have any students ask for alternatives this semester. If students were concerned with the privacy of this software, I was going to recommend PowerPoint as an alternative (this is free to download through our university). If students were concerned with recording themselves in general, I was going to recommend that they keep a detailed log of their actions and reflections. This is also an option for accessibility.

      I included a links to “how to install the Screencastify extension” and “how to record a video with Screencastify” in the assignment. I met virtually with the students during the first week of class so I knew they all had the capability of using their webcams. Perhaps the log option would be a good idea for your students if they have many difficulties with technology.

  7. This is a very interesting idea and I love the candidness of using Screencastify to record their research approaches. I look forward to seeing what else you might discover or include in the future.

  8. Hi Lisa, very interesting use of this exercise! It’s like a hybrid usability test, assignment, and reflection all rolled into one! I’m curious: were students able to view how others navigated through the assignment? I could see a great opportunity for peer learning here.

    • Hi Perry, no they could not, but this is a really interesting idea! I don’t think I would include this in the beginning of the course, before they have had the opportunity to learn any new skills, but it might be a great way to iterate the later assignment. Thanks for sharing your comments and ideas!

  9. Hi Lisa,

    This is a nice exercise to allow students to grow as researchers. I also really appreciate the mention of accessibility check at the end of your presentation!

    • Thank you Linda! I co-led a workshop on designing for accessibility where I included the slide at the end, and now I include it on all of my slides. It’s a great self-check for me, but it also spreads the message to attendees/learners.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *