ACRL Online Discussion Forum “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries”

Join us for the free ACRL online discussion forum “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries” on Thursday, September 24, from 2 – 3 p.m. Central (noon – 1 p.m. Pacific | 1 – 2 p.m. Mountain | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Central | 3 – 4 p.m. Eastern).  Please note that you can convert additional time zones online at http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converterT.html.

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and nearly 80 other organizations recently joined the Lumina Foundation in co-sponsoring a national dialogue on credentialing which calls for ways to transform our nation’s highly diverse and fragmented credentialing system into one that is student-centered and learning-based. Change is needed for several reasons: to ensure educational quality; increase access; better align the work of industry, education and certification/licensure agencies; multiply the benefits of increased attainment; reduce social inequity; and foster individual progress that results in market-valued credentials.

Join this ACRL online discussion forum on September 24 to share your best thinking around what changes are needed and the potential role academic librarians and/or ACRL could play in transforming credentialing in the United States. This discussion is right for you if you already know the basics of digital badges, understand the rationale for a credentialing framework and are beginning to form an opinion about how academic librarians may be uniquely positioned to contribute to this conversation. Your input will help inform ACRL’s contribution to the national conversation.

A group of ACRL member leaders from the Value of Academic Libraries committee and the Digital Badges interest group will kick off the online forum then open the floor for discussion. To help guide your thinking, you may wish to consider these questions:

  1. Should and could information literacy be packaged into a “stackable”, quantifiable credential (such as a digital badge or a certificate) that graduates would use as marketable “currency” in the job world?
  2. How would such a credential be scaffolded throughout the college experience in such a way that various institutions would be able to participate?
  3. Would ACRL become the credentialing body for such a credential or how would an information literacy credential be channeled through in a recognized way that would give it value?
  4. How would you foresee credentialing being developed at your institution?
  5. What role should ACRL play in this national credentialing initiative?

Are you new to these issues? Stay tuned for more later this month when the next issue of ACRL’s current awareness publication Keeping up With… focuses on national credentialing and academic libraries. It will come out prior to this online discussion and may help you prepare to contribute your best thinking.

How to register

Submit your free registration online by 2:00 p.m. Central, Wednesday  September 23, 2015.  The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event.

Questions should be directed to kmalenfant@ala.org.