What You Need to Know: Creating OER at Community College Level

April 25 @ 1:00 pm 2:00 pm

This is one of a series of mini-workshops that highlight important open educational resources (OER) topics. All community college librarians are encouraged to register for a session(s) that interest you. Slides and recordings of each session will be shared to registered participants.

Free

CJCLS OER Committee

What You Need to Know: Inclusive Access

March 28 @ 1:00 pm 2:00 pm

This is one of a series of mini-workshops that highlight important open educational resources (OER) topics. All community college librarians are encouraged to register for a session(s) that interest you. Slides and recordings of each session will be shared to registered participants.

Free

CJCLS OER Committee

What You Need to Know: OER Incentives and Funding

February 29 @ 1:00 pm 2:00 pm

This is one of a series of mini-workshops that highlight important open educational resources (OER) topics. All community college librarians are encouraged to register for a session(s) that interest you. Slides and recordings of each session will be shared to registered participants.

Free

CJCLS OER Committee

What You Need to Know: Course Marking

January 25 @ 1:00 pm 2:00 pm

This is one of a series of mini-workshops that highlight important open educational resources (OER) topics. All community college librarians are encouraged to register for a session(s) that interest you. Slides and recordings of each session will be shared to registered participants.

Free

CJCLS OER Committee

Categories
Events Outreach

CJCLS News for April

Below are two opportunities for professional learning and contributing to the CJCLS community in April.

Attend a Webinar

Register for CJCLS Webinar: How to Create an Effective Survey

April 24, 3-4pm EST 

Interested in using a survey to conduct research, but unsure of the design process? Learn the basics of creating effective research surveys.

Write an Article for the Newsletter

Share what is happening in your libraries and communities with other community college librarians! 

Read our call for CJCLS Newsletter articles. Submit your 200-500 word article by April 24.

Here are some examples of articles from past CJCLS newsletters:

  • Reaching Across the Campus to Support the Freedom to Read
  • The Value of Community Professional Development
  • Zero Textbook Cost Initiative
  • Library Equity Book Group
  • Seniors Going Digital
  • Hamilton Digital Escape Room to Teach Library 101

The More We Share, the More We Have” by Pietro Soldi for Creative Commons. CC BY-SA 4.0.

Categories
Outreach Writing

Call for CJCLS Newsletter Articles

CJCLS colleagues — we would love to hear about what is happening in your libraries and communities! Why not write an article for the Spring 2023 CJCLS Newsletter? We are looking for stories about:

  • library programming
  • library instruction
  • equity, diversity and inclusion initiatives
  • collaborations with other departments or institutions
  • other ideas — what do you have in mind?

Please contact us with any questions, or submit a story between 200-500 words with your name, job title, and your library name to acrlcjcls@gmail.com by Monday, April 24. The newsletter will be published in May on ALA Connect, via social media, and our Newsletters webpage.

We look forward to your ideas and submissions!

Categories
Research Skills Corner

Research and the IRB

Stephanie D. Davis
Christine (Mi-Seon) Kim
ACRL/CJCLS Scholarly Research Committee

Conducting research on human subjects requires oversight, and in higher education this involves working with an Institutional Research Board, the IRB as it is commonly called. In December 2022, the CJCLS Scholarly Research Committee hosted a webinar on the topic, “Successfully Navigating IRB Processes as a Community College Librarian,” featuring a panel of presenters including Faith Bradham, Bakersfield College in California; Vikki C. Terrile, Queensborough Community college, the City University of New York; and Terra Jacobson, Moraine Valley Community College in Illinois.

During the Q&A discussion, panelists were asked a series of questions:

  • What kinds of structures or support are available for the IRB process at your institution?
  • What challenges did you experience? 
  • What are the potential pitfalls? What are the unspoken norms that you should have known?
  • What surprises did you encounter in the IRB process? What was new for you?
  • What are some best practices? What would you have done differently?

The 38 webinar attendees heard from the three panelists about their experiences working with an IRB. The basic requirement of an IRB is for the researcher to share their research plan, such as any instruments they will use to collect data and information, for review by the IRB to ensure the research follows established protocols.

Each panelist indicated that working with an IRB for the first time is a learning process. Terra Jacobson noted, “I was nervous, but it turned out to not be scary, and they were helpful with the process.” It was also shared that each institution approaches the process differently. Large institutions where research is common, like the City University of New York (CUNY), have a formal process with a point person to answer questions and help researchers. At other institutions, the IRB process is informal and is worked out on a case-by-case basis. Not all community colleges have an official IRB, but rather researchers work through an institutional assessment office or other department responsible for collecting and reporting student data.

During the question-and-answer period, attendees were asked about training, approval time as well as potential pitfalls. All three agreed it is beneficial to get training, if possible. Terra and Faith shared that their learning started when they entered a doctoral program. While approval times vary, two weeks was shared as a common time frame. If an IRB has concerns or questions, revisions are possible. Pitfalls included difficulty obtaining consent from research participants, particularly in the online environment, as well as not fully understanding the difference between exempt and non-exempt research. Survey results showed an interest in continuing the conversation on IRBs and the research process in general.

The Scholarly Research Committee's charge is to advance and promote research by and about community college librarians. Information on Committee activities, including future webinars, is available on ALA Connect.
Categories
Events Leadership

CJCLS Volunteer Info Sessions

Interested in volunteering for a Community and Junior College Libraries Section (CJCLS) committee? Our 1st volunteer info session is today! Attend today or register for the session in February:

Learn more about volunteering with CJCLS.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to our Section Vice-Chair, Linda Miles (lmiles.librarian@gmail.com) with any questions.

Categories
Events Leadership

Volunteer with CJCLS

You are invited to volunteer for one of the committees of the Community and Junior College Libraries Section (CJCLS) of ACRL. Learn more about the CJCLS committees:

  • Awards
  • Communications
  • Conference Program Planning
  • Library Staff Education
  • Membership
  • Mentoring Program
  • Nominating
  • Open Educational Resources Committee
  • Scholarly Research
Five hands of different colors raised in their air under the word Volunteer
Tungilik, CC0, via Wikimedia Common

Information Sessions

Attend an upcoming information session to learn more about the committees and volunteering.

Timeline

Submit the ACRL volunteer form by February 28, 2023.

Why Volunteer

Hear from CJCLS members about why they volunteer:

I became active in CJCLS in 2018 when I volunteered for the Membership Committee. I became the chair of the committee and have enjoyed working with community college librarians from across the country.  Our libraries are very different, but also very similar.  I’m so glad I volunteered.

Lisa Eichholtz – Jefferson Community and Technical College, Kentucky

I have been involved in CJCLS for the past three years. Meeting other community college librarians has been inspiring. As part of the Communications Committee, I coordinate the ACRL Community College section blog and newsletter to share stories and ideas from community college librarians across the U.S.

Suzanne Bernsten – Lansing Community College Library, Michigan

There are so many intelligent, thoughtful, and creative community college librarians out there and I’ve learned so much from them. I enjoy hearing about how other people meet challenges and I get inspiration and ideas to bring back to my library. I’m a better community college librarian because of my involvement with CJCLS.

Jill Sodt, Mott Community College, Michigan

Questions

Contact the CJCLS vice-chair, Linda Miles, Hostos Community College, lmiles.librarian@gmail.com

Learn more about CJCLS:

Categories
Research Skills Corner

Recent Research: Students’ Self-Perception of Information Literacy Needs

by Meagan Fowler, Assistant Professor/Librarian
Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland, Ohio

To bring attention to the research that is being conducted in and about community college libraries, in this sponsored post the ACRL CJCLS Scholarly Research Committee would like to highlight research conducted by researchers at Florida State University and the University at Buffalo that was published this past July in College & Research Libraries.

In their article, “Community College Student’s Perceptions of Their Information Literacy Needs,” Latham et al. (2022) set out to explore community college students’ self-perception of their information literacy (IL) needs. Spurred by the paucity of existing research on community college libraries and IL, their research was guided by three research questions:

RQ1. What are the self-perceptions of students concerning their IL needs?

RQ2. Do students’ self-perceptions of their IL needs vary based on their educational and career goals?

RQ3. Do students’ self-perceptions of their IL needs vary based on the type of instruction they received (skills-based vs. threshold concepts)?

Latham et al. (2022) conducted semi-structured interviews with thirty-four students at five community colleges in Florida and New York and found that while students did value IL and understood its importance in their academic, personal, and professional lives, how they applied IL varied depending on the context of the information need (i.e., the sources that they considered acceptable for their personal work may be “good enough” for their academic work). Further information also emerged on the topic of students’ beliefs about their future careers and the applicability of IL and their perception of IL as a set of skills as opposed to threshold concepts.

You are encouraged to read the full article for a detailed review of the findings, interview questions, and implications for future research.

For further information on this research, the researchers can be contacted at: Don Latham (dlatham@fsu.edu), Melissa Gross (mgross@fsu.edu), and Heidi Julien (heidijul@buffalo.edu).

Reference

Latham, D., Gross, M., Julien, H., Warren, F., & Moses, L. (2022). Community College Students’ Perceptions of Their Information Literacy Needs. College & Research Libraries, 83(4), 593–609.