POST: Chasing cows in a swamp? Perspectives on Plan S from Australia and the USA

In a recent post during Open Access Week, Beatrice Gini (University of Cambridge) interviewed Danny Kingsley (Scholarly Communication Consultant) and Micah Vandegrift (Open Knowledge Librarian at NC State University) about Plan S, an Open Access publishing initiative launched in 2018 that requires publicly funded scientific research to be published in open repositories and journals by ...

POST: Intra-Campus Collaboration Around Research Support

Brian Lavoie, a research scientist at OCLC has published a post about developing formal and informal intra-campus collaboration around research support. He shares several observations garnered from recent discussions by the OCLC Research Library Partnership (RLP) Research Support Interest Group: Collaborative relationships on campus are both formal and informal Who you know is important … build ...

POST: The Research Data Sharing Business Landscape

Rebecca Springer and Roger C. Schonfeld (both Ithaka S+R) have co-authored a post on The Scholarly Kitchen, “The Research Data Sharing Business Landscape.” Springer and Schonfeld focus on the business of “large-scale generalist data repositories,” focusing on the four they deem “the most significant players in the landscape today”: Dryad, Mendeley Data, figshare, and Zenodo. ...

POST: OCR Now Available in the National Archives Catalog

The National Archives has announced the addition of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) search capabilities to its online catalog. Until now, the catalog was only searchable by a few metadata fields — including title and description — or crowdsourced tags and transcriptions. OCR functionality will improve search across millions of pages, and potentially make findable some ...

POST: Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain

This Motherboard post by Karl Bode details efforts of archivists, activists, and libraries to vastly expand the number public domain books that are being digitized, with particular emphasis on books published between 1923 and 1964. “As it currently stands, all books published in the U.S. before 1924 are in the public domain, meaning they’re publicly ...

POST: Connections in Sound: Irish traditional music at AFC

In her article “Connections in Sound: Irish traditional music at AFC,” Meghan Ferriter (The Signal) highlights Patrick Egan, a scholar and musician from Ireland. Patrick recently began a six-month residency with the Library of Congress as a Kluge Fellow in Digital Studies. Throughout 2019, Patrick has a number of digital projects underway, sharing data about ...

POST: Should Libraries Be the Keepers of Their Cities’ Public Data?

Linda Poon’s (CityLab) article “Should Libraries Be the Keepers of Their Cities’ Public Data?” looks at the ways in which public libraries engage with open data, and in the process raises interesting questions about the ethics of data dissemination and the role of libraries in protecting privacy. From the article: Libraries are committed to protecting patrons’ ...

POST: Possibilities for Digital Humanities at Community Colleges

Lisa Spiro (executive director of Digital Scholarship Services at Rice University’s Fondren Library) has posted the slides of a recent talk delivered at Houston Community College’s Spring 2019 English & Humanities Colloquium on “The Digital Classroom: Humanities, Literature & Composition.” “Possibilities for Digital Humanities at Community Colleges,” built on Dr. Anne McGrail’s work on DH and community ...

POST: Toward Adversary Anthropologies, or, How to Build Your Own Revolutionary Infrastructure

In a recent article in Cultural Anthropology, Marcel LaFlamme (University of Washington) and Dominic Boyer (Rice University) argue that open access publishing has the potential to facilitate a more revolutionary anthropology, despite the discipline’s reluctance to embrace the movement: Yet the open-access movement has never really caught fire in anthropology beyond a fervent corps of ...

POST: Building Digital Content Management Capacity with Library Carpentry

In a post at The Signal, Jesse A. Johnston (Library of Congress) reported on a Library Carpentry event held at the Library of Congress as a follow up to their 2017 Software Carpentry workshop. The range of experiences, collections responsibilities, and technical know-how made for a lively learning environment, which was perfect for The Carpentries learner-focused ...

POST: The Uncanny Valley and the Ghost in the Machine: a discussion of analogies for thinking about digitized medieval manuscripts

Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) has published the text of talk she presented at the University of Kansas Digital Humanities Seminar in September. “The Uncanny Valley and the Ghost in the Machine: a discussion of analogies for thinking about digitized medieval manuscripts” presents a series of ruminations on digitized books: they’re not the original, but what ...