RECOMMENDED: Paywall: The Business of Scholarship (film)

Jason Schmitt (Clarkson University) has released a new film, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, that explores the academic publishing system: Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines ...

RECOMMENDED: Piloting Digital Scholarship with the John W. Kluge Center and LC Labs

In a post at the Library Of Congress’s blog, The Signal, Eileen Jakeway (Library of Congress) reported on a recent collaborative Digital Scholarship pilot with the John W. Kluge Center. Jakeway drew on a variety of tools and resources to design the program based on the needs of “all the fellows, interns and staff in ...

RECOMMENDED: Diversity Work and Digital Carework in Higher Education

Roopika Risam (Salem State University) has published “Diversity Work and Digital Carework in Higher Education” in First Monday, in which shes addresses the under-examined intersections of affective labor in diversity work and digital humanities. These affective dimensions of diversity work, coupled with the emergence of information and communication technologies that facilitate social media have given rise ...

RECOMMENDED: Designing Digital Scholarship Ecologies

This week, the Idealis featured Micah Vandegrift’s (Florida State University -> North Carolina State University) preprint, “Designing Digital Scholarship Ecologies,” in which he offers a holistic view of digital scholarship and outlines how it is changing the academic library landscape. From the abstract: Digital Scholarship and Scholarly Communication are transforming the practice of librarianship by ...

RECOMMENDED: DLF Fellow Reflections

The Digital Library Federation (DLF) has been publishing reports from its 2017 Fellows. This round-up covers posts by fellows reflecting on the DLF Forum and the Liberal Arts Colleges/HBCUs pre-conference, held in October 2017 in Pittsburgh. In a post published this week, Nicola Andrews (North Carolina State University) writes: However, as I prepared to travel ...

RECOMMENDED: Identifying Early Modern Books: Challenges for Citation Practices in Book History and Early Modern Studies

Archive Journal has published an essay by Meaghan Brown (Folger Shakespeare Library), Paige Morgan (University of Miami), and Jessica Otis (Carnegie Mellon University), “Identifying Early Modern Books: Challenges for Citation Practices in Book History and Early Modern Studies.” The article considers the tools and methodologies of bibliometrics, offering insights into the study of citations to ...

RECOMMENDED: Computation in Conversation

Shawn Averkamp (New York Public Library) gave a presentation, “Computation in Conversation,” at a Library of Congress event hosted by NDSR resident Charlotte Kostelic (@chuckkostelic). As part of the residency, the NDSR fellows each organize an educational event, and Averkamp discussed metadata enrichment of digital collections. From her slide notes: I want to talk today ...

RECOMMENDED: Experiencing the Bust

Laura Mandell (Texas A&M) has posted “Experiencing the Bust,” a response to Timothy Brennan’s “Digital Humanities Bust,” the Chronicle of Higher Education article that caused a stir earlier this month. In it, Mandell asserts that “digital humanities is only busted if you expected it to be salvific,” noting that “it is the utopianists who deserve ...

RECOMMENDED: Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity: Members of the Association of Research Libraries

Last week Ithaka S+R released a report, “Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity: Members of the Association of Research Libraries: Employee Demographics and Director Perspectives,” authored by Roger C. Schonfeld and Liam Sweeney (both Ithaka S+R). The report, which employed demographic surveys and interviews with library directors, found that libraries remain “over three quarters white, and nearly 90% white ...

RECOMMENDED: What Libraries Did with Google Books

Mike Furlough (HathiTrust) has published a storify with his commentary on two recent articles on Google Books, Scott Rosenberg’s “How Google Book Search Got Lost” in Backchannel and James Somers’s “Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria” in The Atlantic. Furlough challenges the articles’ implication that Google Books is a failed project. But we’re still at ...

Round-Up: Archival Futures, Neutrality and Speculative Knowledge Design

The texts of three provocative presentations relating to archival futures, current events, and digital libraries were shared online this week. While each of these texts in themselves merit individual attention, we thought that pulling them together might surface meaningful interconnections: “The Hubris of Neutrality in Archives,” by Samantha Winn (Virginia Tech). Delivered at the Mid-Atlantic ...