Framework Spotlight on Scholarship: “‘Scholarship is a Conversation’: Discourse, Attribution, and Twitter’s Role in Information Literacy Instruction” by Carroll and Dasler

This week’s Spotlight on Scholarship features Alexander J. Carroll’s and Robin Dasler’s article “‘Scholarship is a Conversation’: Discourse, Attribution, and Twitter’s Role in Information Literacy Instruction”, published in the Journal of Creative Library Practice on March 11, 2015.

This article considers the social media platform Twitter: how it functions in ways similar to scholarly discourse, and how this similarity can be leveraged in the classroom to develop information literacy in students. The authors argue that situating information literacy instruction within the culture and spaces students already occupy has the potential to impact student learning in ways both significant and transferable. They ground these claims in evidence-based literature as well as their own experience using with students a case study of plagiarism on Twitter to reframe issues of attribution and discourse participation as relational rather than punitive. The authors connect this approach to the “Scholarship as Conversation” frame, offering readers an example of how to ground the complex information literacy concepts that comprise the Framework by using students’ own online spaces and experiences to do so.

Alexander J. Carroll is Agriculture and Natural Resources Librarian and Robin Dasler is Engineering / Research Data Librarian, both at University of Maryland Libraries.

The “Framework Spotlight on Scholarship” column is a weekly post series highlighting scholarship that uses, builds on, critiques, or responds to the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.