Reflections on Code4Lib 2018

A few members of Tech Connect attended the recent Code4Lib 2018 conference in Washington, DC. If you missed it, the full livestream of the conference is on the Code4Lib YouTube channel. We wanted to  highlight some of our favorite talks and tie them into the work we’re doing. Also, it’s worth pointing to the Code4Lib … Continue reading “Reflections on Code4Lib 2018”

A Reflection on Code4Lib 2016

See also: Margaret’s reflections on Code4Lib 2013 and recap of the 2012 keynote.   About a month ago was the 2016 Code4Lib conference in sunny Philadelphia. I’ve only been to a few Code4Lib conferences, starting with Raleigh in 2014, but it’s quickly become my favorite libraryland conference. This won’t be a comprehensive recap but a … Continue reading “A Reflection on Code4Lib 2016”

Reflections on Code4Lib 2013

Disclaimer: I was on the planning committee for Code4Lib 2013, but this is my own opinion and does not reflect other organizers of the conference. We have mentioned Code4Lib before on this blog, but for those who are unfamiliar, it is a loose collective of programmers working in libraries, librarians, and others interested in code … Continue reading “Reflections on Code4Lib 2013”

Our Assumptions: of Neutrality, of People, & of Systems

Discussions of neutrality have been coming up a lot in libraryland recently. I would argue that people have been talking about this for years1 2 3 4,  but this year we saw a confluence of events drive the “neutrality of libraries” topic to the fore. To be clear, I have a position on this on … Continue reading “Our Assumptions: of Neutrality, of People, & of Systems”

Taking Diversity to the Next Level

Getting Minorities on Board I recently moderated a panel discussion program titled “Building Bridges in a Divisive Climate: Diversity in Libraries, Archives, and Museums.”1 Participating in organizing this program was interesting experience. During the whole time, I experienced my perspective constantly shifting back and forth as (i) someone who is a woman of color in … Continue reading “Taking Diversity to the Next Level”

Decentralizing Library IT

I’ve always gravitated toward library jobs in library systems and technology, but I recently took on a new position as head of a tech services department in a smaller academic library.  Some of my colleagues expressed surprised that I’m moving out of a traditional library IT or systems role, but my former position was as … Continue reading “Decentralizing Library IT”

Voice, Natural Language Processing, and the Future of Library Experiences

Is the future of research voice controlled? It might be, because when I originally had the idea for this post my first instinct was to grab my phone and dictate my half-formed ideas into a note, rather than typing it out. Writing things down often makes them seem wrong and not at all what we … Continue reading “Voice, Natural Language Processing, and the Future of Library Experiences”

Looking Across the Digital Preservation Landscape

When it comes to digital preservation, everyone agrees that a little bit is better than nothing. Look no further than these two excellent presentations from Code4Lib 2016, “Can’t Wait for Perfect: Implementing “Good Enough” Digital Preservation” by Shira Peltzman and Alice Sara Prael, and “Digital Preservation 101, or, How to Keep Bits for Centuries” by … Continue reading “Looking Across the Digital Preservation Landscape”

Wikipedia, Libraries, & Neutrality

This piece is substantially based off of a column I wrote for RUSQ that will appear early next year. Broadly construed, there are two camps of opinions surrounding Wikipedia in librarianship. The first is that Wikipedia is not an academic quality source. It is something students need to be warned away from. The community authorship … Continue reading “Wikipedia, Libraries, & Neutrality”

A Forray into Publishing Open Data on GitHub

While we’ve written about using GitHub for publishing before, in this post I will explore publishing data on GitHub, as opposed to a presentation or academic paper. There are a few services where one can publish research data—FigShare comes to mind—but I wanted to try GitHub because I’m already familiar with the service, it seems … Continue reading “A Forray into Publishing Open Data on GitHub”