Creating Presentations with Beautiful.AI

Updated 2018-11-12 at 3:30PM with accessibility information.

Beautiful.AI is a new website that enables users to create dynamic presentations quickly and easily with “smart templates” and other design optimized features. So far the service is free with a paid pro tier coming soon. I first heard about Beautiful.AI in an advertisement on NPR and was immediately intrigued. The landscape of presentation software platforms has broadened in recent years to include websites like Prezi, Emaze, and an array of others beyond the tried and true PowerPoint. My preferred method of creating presentations for the past couple of years has been to customize the layouts available on Canva and download the completed PDFs for use in PowerPoint. I am also someone who enjoys tinkering with fonts and other design elements until I get a presentation just right, but I know that these steps can be time consuming and overwhelming for many people. With that in mind, I set out to put Beautiful.AI to the test by creating a short “prepare and share” presentation about my first experience at ALA’s Annual Conference this past June for an upcoming meeting.

A title slide created with Beautiful.AI.

Features

To help you get started, Beautiful.AI includes an introductory “Design Tips for Beautiful Slides” presentation. It is also fully customizable so you can play around with all of of the features and options as you explore, or you can click on “create new presentation” to start from scratch. You’ll then be prompted to choose a theme, and you can also choose a color palette. Once you start adding slides you can make use of Beautiful.AI’s template library. This is the foundation of the site’s usefulness because it helps alleviate guesswork about where to put content and that dreaded “staring at the blank slide” feeling. Each individual slide becomes a canvas as you create a presentation, similar to what is likely familiar in PowerPoint. In fact, all of the most popular PowerPoint features are available in Beautiful.AI, they’re just located in very different places. From the navigation at the left of the screen users can adjust the colors and layout of each slide as well as add images, animation, and presenter notes. Options to add, duplicate, or delete a slide are available on the right of the screen. The organize feature also allows you to zoom out and see all of the slides in the presentation.

Beautiful.AI offers a built-in template to create a word cloud.

One of Beautiful.AI’s best features, and my personal favorite, is its built-in free stock image library. You can choose from pre-selected categories such as Data, Meeting, Nature, or Technology or search for other images. An import feature is also available, but providing the stock images is extremely useful if you don’t have your own photos at the ready. Using these images also ensures that no copyright restrictions are violated and helps add a professional polish to your presentation. The options to add an audio track and advance times to slides are also nice to have for creating presentations as tutorials or introductions to a topic. When you’re ready to present, you can do so directly from the browser or export to PDF or PowerPoint. Options to share with a link or embed with code are also available.

Usability

While intuitive design and overall usability won’t necessarily make or break the existence of a presentation software platform, each will play a role in influencing whether someone uses it more than once. For the most part, I found Beautiful.AI to be easy and fun to use. The interface is bold, yet simplistic, and on trend with current website design aesthetics. Still, users who are new to creating presentations online in a non-PowerPoint environment may find the Beautiful.AI interface to be confusing at first. Most features are consolidated within icons and require you to hover over them to reveal their function. Icons like the camera to represent “Add Image” are pretty obvious, but others such as Layout and Organize are less intuitive. Some of Beautiful.AI’s terminology may also not be as easily recognizable. For example, the use of the term “variations” was confusing to me at first, especially since it’s only an option for the title slide.

The absence of any drag and drop capability for text boxes is definitely a feature that’s missing for me. This is really where the automated design adaptability didn’t seem to work as well as I would’ve expected given that it’s one of the company’s most prominent marketing statements. On the title slide of my presentation, capitalizing a letter in the title caused the text to move closer to the edge of the slide. In Canva, I could easily pull the text block over to the left a little or adjust the font size down by a few points. I really am a stickler for spacing in my presentations, and I would’ve expected this to be an element that the “Design AI” would pick up on. Each template also has different pre-set design elements, and it can be confusing when you choose one that includes a feature that you didn’t expect. Yet, text sizes that are pre-set to fit the dimensions of each template does help not only with readability in the creation phase but with overall visibility for audiences. Again, this alleviates some of the guesswork that often happens in PowerPoint with not knowing exactly how large your text sizes will appear when projected onto larger screens.

A slide created using a basic template and stock photos available in Beautiful.AI.

One feature that does work really well is the export option. Exporting to PowerPoint creates a perfectly sized facsimile presentation, and being able to easily download a PDF is very useful for creating handouts or archiving a presentation later on. Both are nice to have as a backup for conferences where Internet access may be spotty, and it’s nice that Beautiful.AI understands the need for these options. Unfortunately, Beautiful.AI doesn’t address accessibility on its FAQ page nor does it offer alternative text or other web accessibility features. Users will need to add their own slide titles and alt text in PowerPoint and Adobe Acrobat after exporting from Beautiful.AI to create an accessible presentation. 

Conclusion

Beautiful.AI challenged me to think in new ways about how best to deliver information in a visually engaging way. It’s a useful option for librarians and students who are looking for a presentation website that is fun to use, engaging, and on trend with current web design.

Click here to view “My first ALA”presentation created with Beautiful.AI.


Jeanette Sewell is the Database and Metadata Management Coordinator at Fondren Library, Rice University.

National Forum on Web Privacy and Web Analytics

We had the fantastic experience of participating in the National Forum on Web Privacy and Web Analytics in Bozeman, Montana last month. This event brought together around forty people from different areas and types of libraries to do in-depth discussion and planning about privacy issues in libraries. Our hosts from Montana State University, Scott Young, Jason Clark, Sara Mannheimer, and Jacqueline Frank, framed the event with different (though overlapping) areas of focus. We broke into groups based on our interests from a pre-event survey and worked through a number of activities to identify projects. You can follow along with all the activities and documents produced during the Forum in this document that collates all of them.

Drawing of ship
Float your boat exercise

            While initially worried that the activities would feel too forced, instead they really worked to release creative ideas. Here’s an example: our groups drew pictures of boats with sails showing opportunities, and anchors showing problems. We started out in two smaller subgroups of our subgroups and drew a boat, then met with the large subgroup to combine the boat ideas. This meant that it was easy to spot the common themes—each smaller group had written some of the same themes (like GDPR). Working in metaphor meant we could express some more complex issues, like politics, as the ocean—something that always surrounds the issue and can be helpful or unhelpful without much warning. This helped us think differently about issues and not get too focused on our own individual perspective.

The process of turning metaphor into action was hard. We had to take the whole world of problems and opportunities and come up with how these could be realistically accomplished. Good and important ideas had to get left behind because they were so big there was no way to feasibly plan them, certainly not in a day or two. The differing assortment of groups (which were mixable where ideas overlapped) ensured that we were able to question each other’s assumptions and ask some hard questions. For example, one of the issues Margaret’s group had identified as a problem was disagreement in the profession about what the proper limits were on privacy. Individually identifiable usage metrics are a valuable commodity to some, and a thing not to be touched to others. While everyone in the room was probably biased more in favor of privacy than perhaps the profession at large is, we could share stories and realities of the types of data we were collecting and what it was being used for. Considering the realities of our environments, one of our ideas to bring everyone from across the library and archives world to create a unified set of privacy values was not going to happen. Despite that, we were able to identify one of the core problems that led to a lack of unity, which was, in many cases, lack of knowledge about what privacy issues existed and how these might affect institutions. When you don’t completely understand something, or only half understand it, you are more likely to be afraid of it.

            On the afternoon of the second day and continuing into the morning of the third day, we had to get serious and pick just one idea to focus on to create a project plan. Again, the facilitators utilized a few processes that helped us take a big idea and break it down into more manageable components. We used “Big SCAI” thinking to frame the project: what is the status quo, what are the challenges, what actions are required, and what are the ideals. From there we worked through what was necessary for the project, nice to have, unlikely to get, and completely unnecessary to the project. This helped focus efforts and made the process of writing a project implementation plan much easier.

Laptop with postits on wall.
What the workday looked like.

Writing the project implementation plan as a group was made easier by shared documents, but we all commented on the irony of using Google Docs to write privacy plans. On the other hand, trying to figure out how to write in groups and easily share what we wrote using any other platform was a challenge in the moment. This reality illustrates the problems with privacy: the tool that is easiest to use and comes to mind first will be the one that ends up being used. We have to create tools that make privacy easy (which was a discussion many of us at the Forum had), but even more so we need to think about the tradeoffs that we make in choosing a tool and educate ourselves and others about this. In this case, since all the outcomes of the project were going to be public anyway, going on the “quick and easy” side was ok.

            The Forum project leaders recently presented about their work at the DLF Forum 2018 conference. In this presentation, they outlined the work that they did leading up to the Forum, and the strategies that emerged from the day. They characterized the strategies as Privacy Badging and Certifications, Privacy Leadership Training, Privacy for Tribal Communities and Organizations, Model License for Vendor Contracts, Privacy Research Institute, and a Responsible Assessment Toolkit. You can read through the thought process and implementation strategies for these projects and others yourself at the project plan index. The goal is to ensure that whoever wants to do the work can do it. To quote Scott Young’s follow-up email, “We ask only that you keep in touch with us for the purposes of community facilitation and grant reporting, and to note the provenance of the idea in future proposals—a sort of CC BY designation, to speak in copyright terms.”

            For us, this three-day deep dive into privacy was an inspiration and a chance to make new connections (while also catching up with some old friends). But even more, it was a reminder that you don’t need much of anything to create a community. Provided the right framing, as long as you have people with differing experiences and perspectives coming together to learn from each other, you’ve facilitated the community-building.  

Reflections on Code4Lib 2018

A few members of Tech Connect attended the recent Code4Lib 2018 conference in Washington, DC. If you missed it, the full livestream of the conference is on the Code4Lib YouTube channel. We wanted to  highlight some of our favorite talks and tie them into the work we’re doing.

Also, it’s worth pointing to the Code4Lib community’s Statement in Support of opening keynote speaker Chris Bourg. Chris offered some hard truths in her speech that angry men on the internet, predictably, were unhappy about, but it’s a great model that the conference organizers and attendees promptly stood in support.


Ashley:

One of my favorite talks at Code4lib this year was Amy Wickner’s talk, “Web Archiving and You / Web Archiving and Us.” (Video, slides) I felt this talk really captured some of the essence of what I love most about Code4lib, this being my 4th conference in the past 5 years. (And I believe this was Amy’s first!). This talk was about a technical topic relevant to collecting libraries and handled in a way that acknowledges and prioritizes the essential personal component of any technical endeavor. This is what I found so wonderful about Amy’s talk and this is what I find so refreshing about Code4lib as an inherently technical conference with intentionality behind the human aspects of it.

Web archiving seems to be something of interest but seemingly overwhelming to begin to tackle. I mean, the internet is just so big. Amy brought forth a sort of proposal for ways in which a person or institution can begin thinking about how to start a web archiving project, focusing first on the significance of appraisal. Wickner, citing Terry Cook, spoke of the “care and feeding of archives” and thinking about appraisal as storytelling. I think this is a great way to make a big internet seem smaller, understanding the importance of care in appraisal while acknowledging that for web archiving, it is an essential practice. Representation in web archives is more likely to be chosen in the appraisal of web materials than in other formats historically.

This statement resonated with me: “Much of the power that archivists wield are in how we describe or create metadata that tells a story of a collection and its subjects.”

And also: For web archives, “the narrative of how they are built is closely tied to the stories they tell and how they represent the world.”

Wickner went on to discuss how web archives are and will be used, and who they will be used by, giving some examples but emphasizing there are many more, noting that we must learn to “critically read as much as learn to critically build” web archives, while acknowledging web archives exist both within and outside of institutions. And that for personal archiving, it can be as simple as replacing links in documents with perma.cc, Wayback Machine links, or WebRecorder links.

Another topic I enjoyed in this talk was the celebration of precarious web content through community storytelling on Twitter with the hashtags #VinesWithoutVines and #GifHistory, two brief but joyous moments.


Bohyun:

The part of this year’s Code4Lib conference that I found most interesting was the talks and the discussion at a breakout session related to machine learning and deep learning. Machine learning is a subfield of artificial intelligence and deep learning is a kind of machine learning that utilizes hidden layers between the input layer and the output layer in order to refine and produce the algorithm that best represents the result in the output. Once such algorithm is produced from the data in the training set, it can be applied to a new set of data to predict results. Deep learning has been making waves in many fields such as Go playing, autonomous driving, and radiology to name a few. There were a few different talks on this topic ranging from reference chat sentiment analysis to feature detection (such as railroads) in the map data using the convolutional neural network model.

“Deep Learning for Libraries” presented by Lauren Di Monte and Nilesh Patil from University of Rochester was the most practical one among those talks as it started with a specific problem to solve and resulted in action that will address the problem. In their talk, Di Monte and Patil showed how they applied deep learning techniques to solve a problem in their library’s space assessment. The problem that they wanted to solve is to find out how many people visit the library to use the library’s space and services and how many people are simply passing through to get to another building or to the campus bus stop that is adjacent to the library. This made it difficult for the library to decide on the appropriate staffing level or the hours that best serve the users’ needs. It also prevented the library from showing the library’s reach and impact based upon the data and advocate for needed resources or budget to the decision-makers on the campus. The goal of their project was to develop automated and scalable methods for conducting space assessment and reporting tools that support decision-making for operations, service design, and service delivery.

For this project, they chose an area bounded by four smart control access gates on the first floor. They obtained the log files (with the data at the sensor level minute by minute) from the eight bi-directional sensors on those gates. They analyzed the data in order to create a recurrent neural network model. They trained the algorithm using this model, so that they can predict the future incoming and the outgoing traffic in that area and visually present those findings as a data dashboard application. For data preparation, processing, and modeling, they used Python. The tools used included Seaborn, Matplotlib, Pandas, NumPy, SciPy, TensorFlow, and Keras. They picked the recurrent neural network with stochastic gradient descent optimization, which is less complex than the time series model. For data visualization, they used Tableau. The project code is available at the library’s GitHub repo: https://github.com/URRCL/predicting_visitors.

Their project result led to the library to install six more gates in order to get a better overview of the library space usage. As a side benefit, the library was also able to pinpoint the times when the gates malfunctioned and communicate the issue with the gate vendor. Di Monte and Patil plan to hand over this project to the library’s assessment team for ongoing monitoring and to look for ways to map the library’s traffic flow across multiple buildings as the next step.

Overall, there were a lot of interests in machine learning, deep learning, and artificial intelligence at the Code4Lib conference this year. The breakout session I led at the conference on these topics produced a lively discussion on a variety of tools, current and future projects for many different libraries, as well as the impact of rapidly developing AI technologies on society. This breakout session also generated #ai-dl-ml channel in the Code4Lib Slack Space. The growing interests in these areas are also shown in the newly formed Machine and Deep Learning Research Interest Group of the Library and Information Technology Association. I hope to see more talks and discussion on these topics in the future Code4Lib and other library technology conferences.


Eric:

One of the talks which struck me the most this year was Matthew Reidsma’s Auditing Algorithms. He used examples of search suggestions in the Summon discovery layer to show biased and inaccurate results:

In 2015 my colleague Jeffrey Daniels showed me the Summon search results for his go-to search: “Stress in the workplace.” Jeff likes this search because ‘stress’ is a common engineering term as well as one common to psychology and the social sciences. The search demonstrates how well a system handles word proximities, and in this regard, Summon did well. There are no apparent results for evaluating bridge design. But Summon’s Topic Explorer, the right-hand sidebar that provides contextual information about the topic you are searching for, had an issue. It suggested that Jeff’s search for “stress in the workplace” was really a search about women in the workforce. Implying that stress at work was caused, perhaps, by women.

This sort of work is not, for me, novel or groundbreaking. Rather, it was so important to hear because of its relation to similar issues I’ve been reading about since library school. From the bias present in Library of Congress subject headings where “Homosexuality” used to be filed under “Sexual deviance”, to Safiya Noble’s work on the algorithmic bias of major search engines like Google where her queries for the term “black girls” yielded pornographic results; our systems are not neutral but reify the existing power relations of our society. They reflect the dominant, oppressive forces that constructed them. I contrast LC subject headings and Google search suggestions intentionally; this problem is as old as the organization of information itself. Whether we use hierarchical, browsable classifications developed by experts or estimated proximities generated by an AI with massive amounts of user data at its disposal, there will be oppressive misrepresentations if we don’t work to prevent them.

Reidsma’s work engaged with algorithmic bias in a way that I found relatable since I manage a discovery layer. The talk made me want to immediately implement his recording script in our instance so I can start looking for and reporting problematic results. It also touched on some of what despairs me in library work lately—our reliance on vendors and their proprietary black boxes. We’ve had a number of issues lately related to full-text linking that are confusing for end users and make me feel powerless. I submit support ticket after support ticket only to be told there’s no timeline for the fix.

On a happier note, there were many other talks at Code4Lib that I enjoyed and admired: Chris Bourg gave a rousing opening keynote featuring a rallying cry against mansplaining; Andreas Orphanides, who keynoted last year’s conference, gave yet another great talk on design and systems theory full of illuminating examples; Jason Thomale’s introduction to Pycallnumber wowed me and gave me a new tool I immediately planned to use; Becky Yoose navigated the tricky balance between using data to improve services and upholding our duty to protect patron privacy. I fear I’ve not mentioned many more excellent talks but I don’t want to ramble any further. Suffice to say, I always find Code4Lib worthwhile and this year was no exception.

A Reflection on Code4Lib 2016

See also: Margaret’s reflections on Code4Lib 2013 and recap of the 2012 keynote.

 


About a month ago was the 2016 Code4Lib conference in sunny Philadelphia. I’ve only been to a few Code4Lib conferences, starting with Raleigh in 2014, but it’s quickly become my favorite libraryland conference. This won’t be a comprehensive recap but a little taste of what makes the event so special.

Appetizers: Preconferences

One of the best things about Code4Lib is the affordable preconferences. It’s often a pittance to add on a preconference or two, extending your conference for a whole day. Not only that, there’s typically a wealth of options: the 2015 conference boasted fifteen preconferences to choose from, and Philadelphia somehow managed to top that with an astonishing twenty-four choices. Not only are they numerous, the preconferences vary widely in their topics and goals. There’s always intensely practical ones focused on bootstrapping people new to a particular framework, programming language, or piece of software (e.g. Railsbridge, workshops focused on Blacklight or Hydra). But there are also events for practicing your presentation or the aptly named “Getting Ready for Workshops” Workshop. One of my personal favorite ideas—though I must admit I’ve never attended—is the perennial “Fail4Lib” sessions where attendees examine their projects that haven’t succeeded and discuss what they’ve learned.

This year, I wanted to run a preconference of my own. I enjoy teaching, but I rarely get to do it in my current position. Previously, in a more generalist technologist position, I would teach information literacy alongside the other librarians. But as a Systems Librarian, it can sometimes feel like I rarely get out from behind my terminal. A preconference was an appealing chance to teach information professionals on a topic that I’ve accumulated some expertise in. So I worked with Coral Sheldon-Hess to put together a workshop focused on the fundamentals of the command line: what it is, how to use it, and some of the pivotal concepts. I won’t say too much more about the workshop because Coral wrote an excellent, detailed blog post right after we were done. The experience was great and feedback we received, including a couple kind emails from our participants, was very positive. Perhaps we, or someone else, can repeat the workshop in the future, as we put all our materials online.

Main Course: Presentations

Thankfully I don’t have to detail the conference talks too much, because they’re all available on YouTube. If a talk looks intriguing, I strongly encourage you to check out the recording. I’m not too ashamed to admit that a few went way over my head, so seeing the original will certainly be more informative than any summary I could offer.

One thing that was striking was how the two keynotes centered on themes of privacy and surveillance. Kate Krauss, Director of Communications of the Tor Project, lead the conference off. Naturally, Tor being privacy software, Krauss focused on stories of government surveillance. She noted how surveillance focuses on the most marginalized people, citing #BlackLivesMatter and the transgender community as examples. Krauss’ talk provided concrete steps that librarians could take, for instance examining our own data collection practices, ensuring our services are secure, hosting privacy workshops, and running a Tor relay. She even mentioned The Library Freedom Project as a positive example of librarians fighting online surveillance, which she posited as one of the premier civil rights issues of our time.

On the final day, Gabriel Weinberg of the search engine DuckDuckGo spoke on similar themes, except he concentrated on how his company’s lack of personalization and tracking differentiated it from companies like Google and Apple. To me, Weinberg’s talk bookended well with Krauss’ because he highlighted the dangers of corporate surveillance. While the government certainly has abused its access to certain fundamental pieces of our country’s infrastructure—obtaining records from major telecom companies without a warrant comes to mind—tech companies are also culpable in enabling the unparalleled degree of surveillance possible in the modern era, simply by collecting such massive quantities of data linked to individuals (and, all too often, by failing to secure their applications properly).

While the pair of keynotes were excellent and thematic, my favorite moments of the conference were the talks by librarians. Becky Yoose gave perhaps the most rousing, emotional talk I’ve ever heard at a conference on the subject of burnout. Burnout is all too real in our profession, but not often spoken of, particularly in such a public venue. Becky forced us all to confront the healthiness and sustainability of our work/life balance, stressing the importance not only of strong organizational policies to prevent burnout but also personal practices. Finally, Andreas Orphanides gave a thoughtful presentation on the political implications of design choices. Dre’s well-chosen, alternatingly brutal and funny examples—from sidewalk spikes that prevent homeless people from lying in doorways, to an airline website labelling as “lowest” a price clearly higher than others on the very same page—outlined how our design choices reflect our values, and how we can better align our values with those of our users.

I don’t mean to discredit anyone else’s talks—there were many more excellent ones, on a variety of topics. Dinah Handel captured my feelings best in this enthusiastic tweet:

Dessert: Community

My main enjoyment from Code4Lib is the sense of community. You’ll hear a lot of people at conferences state things like “I feel like these are my people.” And we are lucky as a profession to have plenty of strong conference options, depending on our locality, specialization, and interests. At Code4Lib, I feel like I can strike up a conversation with anyone I meet about an impending ILS migration, my favorite command-line tool, or the vagaries of mapping between metadata schemas. While I love my present position, I’m mostly a solo systems person surrounded by a few other librarians all with a different expertise. As much as I want to discuss how ludicrous the webpub.def syntax is, or why reading XSLT makes me faintly ill, I know it’d bore my colleagues to death. At Code4Lib, people can at least tolerate such subjects of conversation, if not revel in them.

Code4Lib is great not solely because of it’s focus on technology and code, which a few other library organizations share, but because of the efforts of community members to make it a pleasurable experience for all. To name just a couple of the new things Code4Lib introduced this year: while previous years have had Duty Officers whom attendees could safely report harassment to, they were announced & much more visible this year; sponsored child care was available for conference goers with small children; and a service provided live transcription of all the talks.1 This is in addition to a number of community-building measures that previous Code4Lib conferences featured, such as a series of newcomers dinners on the first night, a “share and play” game night, and diversity scholarships. Overall, it’s evident that the Code4Lib community is committed to being positive and welcoming. Not that other library organizations aren’t, but it should be evident that our profession isn’t immune from problems. Being proactive and putting in place measures to prevent issues like harassment is a shining example of what makes Code4Lib great.

All this said, the community does have its issues. While a 40% female attendance rate is fair for a technology conference, it’s clear that the intersection of coding and librarianship is more male-dominated than the rest of the profession at large. Notably, Code4Lib has done an incredible job of democratically selecting keynote speakers over the past few years—five female and one male for the past three conferences—but the conference has also been largely white, so much so that the 2016 conference’s Program Committee gave a lightning talk addressing the lack of speaker diversity. Hopefully, measures like the diversity scholarships and conscious efforts on the part of the community can make progress here. But the unbearable whiteness of librarianship remains a very large issue.

Finally, it’s worth noting that Code4Lib is entirely volunteer-run. Since it’s not an official professional organization with membership dues and full-time staff members, everything is done by people willing to spare their own time to make the occasion a great one. A huge thanks to the local planning committee and all the volunteers who made such a great event possible. It’s pretty stunning to me that Code4Lib manages to put together some of the nicest benefits of any conference—the live streaming and transcribed talks come to mind—without a huge backing organization, and while charging pretty reasonable registration prices.

Night Cap

I’d recommend Code4Lib to anyone in the library community who deals with technology, whether you’re a manager, cataloger, systems person, or developer. There’s a wide breadth of material suitable for anyone and a great, supportive community. If that’s not enough, the proportion of presentations featuring pictures of cats and/or animated gifs is higher than your average conference.

Notes

  1. Aside: Matt Miller made a fun “Overheard at Code4Lib 2016” app using the transcripts

Library & Academic Tech Conferences Roundup

Here we present a summary of various library technology conferences that ACRL TechConnect authors have been to. There are a lot of them and some fairly niche. So we hope this guide serves to assist neophytes and veterans alike in choosing how they spend their limited professional development monies. Do you attend one of these conferences every year because it’s awesome? Did we miss your favorite conference? Let us know in the comments!

The lisevents.com website might be of interest, as it compiles LIS conferences of all types. Also, one might be able to get a sense of the content of a conference by searching for its hashtag on Twitter. Most conferences list their hashtag on their website.

Access

  • Time: late in the year, typically September or October
  • Place: Canada
  • Website: http://accessconference.ca/
  • Access is a Canada’s annual library technology conference. Although the focus is primarily on technology, a wide variety of topics are addressed from linked data, innovation, makerspace, to digital archiving by librarians in various areas of specialization. (See the past conferences’ schedules: http://accessconference.ca/about/past-conferences/) Access provides an excellent opportunity to get an international perspective without traveling too far. Access is also a single-track conference, offers great opportunities to network, and starts with preconferences and the hackathon, which welcomes to all types of librarians not just library coders. Both preconferences and the hackathon are optional but highly recommended. (p.s. One of the ACRL TechConnect authors thinks that this is the conference with the best conference lunch and snacks.)

Code4Lib

  • Time: early in the year, typically February but this year in late March
  • Place: varies
  • Website: http://code4lib.org/conference/
  • Code4Lib is unique in that it is organized by a group of volunteers and not supported by any formal organization. While it does cover some more general technology concepts, the conference tends to be focused on coding, naturally. Preconferences from past years have covered the Railsbridge curriculum for learning Ruby on Rails and Blacklight, the open source discovery interface. Code4Lib moves quickly—talks are short (20 minutes) with even shorter lightning talks thrown in—but is also all on one track in the same room; attendees can see every presentation.

Computers in Libraries

  • Time: Late March or early April
  • Place: Washington, DC
  • Website: http://www.infotoday.com/conferences.asp
  • Computers in Libraries is a for-profit conference hosted by Information Today. Its use of tracks, organizing presentations around a topic or group of topics, is a useful way to attend a conference and its overall size is more conducive to networking, socializing, and talking with vendors in the exhibit hall than many other conferences. However, the role of consultants in panel and presentation selection and conference management, as opposed to people who work in libraries, means that there is occasionally a focus on trends that are popular at the moment, but don’t pan out, as well as language more suited to an MBA than an MLIS. The conference also lacks a code of conduct and given the corporate nature of the conference, the website is surprisingly antiquated.
  • They also run Internet Librarian, which meets in Monterey, California, every fall.
    — Jacob Berg, Library Director, Trinity Washington University

Digital Library Federation Forum

  • Time: later in the year, October or November
  • Place: varies
  • Website: http://www.diglib.org/
  • We couldn’t find someone who attended this. If you have, please add your review of this conference in the comments section!

edUI

  • Time: late in the year, typically November
  • Place: Richmond, VA
  • Website: http://eduiconf.org/
  • Not a library conference, edUI is aimed at web professionals working in higher education but draws a fair number of librarians. The conference tends to draw excellent speakers, both from within higher education and the web industry at large. Sessions cover user experience, design, social media, and current tools of the trade. The talks suit a broad range of specialties, from programmers to people who work on the web but aren’t technologists foremost.

Electronic Resources & Libraries

  • Time: generally early in the year, late-February to mid-March.
  • Place: Austin, TX
  • Website: http://www.electroniclibrarian.com/
  • The main focus of this conference is workflows and issues surrounding electronic resources (such as licensed databases and online journals, and understanding these is crucial to anyone working with library technology, whether or not they manage e-resources on a daily basis. In recent years the conference has expanded greatly into areas such as open access and user experience, with tracks specifically dedicated to those areas. This year there were also some overlapping programs and themes with SXSW and the Leadership, Technology, Gender Summit.

Handheld Librarian

  • Time: held a few times throughout the year
  • Place: online
  • Website: http://handheldlibrarian.org
  • An online conference devoted specifically to mobile technologies. The advantage of this conference is that without traveling, you can get a glimpse of the current developments and applications of mobile technologies in libraries. It originally started in 2009 as an annual one-day online conference based upon the accepted presentation proposals submitted in advance. The conference went through some changes in recent years, and now it offers a separate day of workshops in addition and focuses on a different theme in mobile technologies in libraries. All conference presentations and workshops are recorded. If you are interested in attending, it is a good idea to check out the presentations and the speakers in advance.

Internet Librarian

  • Time: October
  • Place: Monterey, CA
  • Website: http://www.infotoday.com/conferences.asp
  • Internet Librarian is for-profit conference hosted by Information Today. It is quite similar to Information Today’s Computers in Libraries utilizing tracks to organize a large number of presentations covering a broad swath of library information technology topics. Internet Librarian also hosts the Internet @ Schools track that focus on the IT needs of the K12 library community. IL is held annually in Monterey California in October. The speaker list is deep and varied and one can expect keynote speakers to be prominent and established names in the field. The conference is well attended and provides a good opportunity to network with library technology peers. As with Computers in Libraries, there is no conference code of conduct.

KohaCon

  • Time: varies, typically in the second half of the year
  • Place: varies, international
  • Website: http://koha-community.org/kohacon/
  • The annual conference devoted to the Koha open source ILS.

 Library Technology Conference

  • Time: mid-March
  • Place: St. Paul, MN
  • Website: http://libtechconf.org/
  • LTC is an annual library conference that takes place in March. It’s both organized by and takes place at Macalester College in St. Paul. Not as completely tech-heavy as a Code4Lib or even an Access, talks at LTC tend to run a whole range of technical aptitudes. Given the time and location of LTC, it has historically been primarily of regional interest but has seen elevating levels of participation nationally and internationally.
    — John Fink, Digital Scholarship Librarian, McMaster University
  • We asked Twitter for a short overview of Library Technology Conference, and Matthew Reidsma offered up this description:

LITA Forum

  • Time: Late in the year, typically November
  • Place: varies
  • Website: http://www.ala.org/lita/conferences
  • A general library technology conference that’s moderately sized, with some 300 attendees most years. One of LITA’s nice aspects is that, because of the smaller size of the conference and the arranged networking dinners, it’s very easy to meet other librarians. You need not be involved with LITA to attend and there are no committee or business meetings.

Open Repositories

  • Time: mid-summer, June or July
  • Place: varies, international
  • Website: changes each year, here are the 2013 and 2014 sites
  • A mid-sized conference focused specifically on institutional repositories.

Online NorthWest

  • Time: February
  • Place: Corvallis, OR
  • Website: http://onlinenorthwest.org/
  • A small library technology conference in the Pacific Northwest. Hosted by the Oregon University System, but invites content from Public, Medical, Special, Legal, and Academic libraries.

THATcamps

  • Time: all the time
  • Place: varies, international
  • Website: http://thatcamp.org/
  • Every THATCamp is different, but all revolve around technology and the humanities (i.e. The Technology And Humanities Camp). They are unconferences with “no spectators”, and so will reflect the interests of the participants. Some have specific themes such as digital pedagogy, others are attached to conferences as pre or post conference events, and some are more general regional events. Librarians are important participants in THATCamps, and if there is one in your area or at a conference you’re attending, you should go. They cost under $30 and are a great networking and education opportunity. Sign up for the THATCamp mailing list or subscribe to the RSS feed to find out about new THATCamps. They have a attendee limit and usually fill up quickly.