How I Work (Eric Phetteplace)

Editor’s Note: ACRL TechConnect blog will run a series of posts by our regular and guest authors about The Setup of our work. This is the second post of the series by one of our TechConnect authors Eric Phetteplace.

The whole Tech Connect crew is doing The Setup. Here’s mine.

Location

Oakland, California, United States

Current Gig

Systems Librarian; California College of the Arts

Current Mobile Device

I use an iPhone 5S though mostly just for InstaPaper, TweetBot, and email (Mailbox). I’ve grown frustrated with iOS lately and I think my next phone will be either Android or, if I’m feeling experimental, Firefox OS.

Current Computer

Work:

  • 2011 13in Macbook Pro with 8gb RAM and a 2.7 GHz i7 running OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. I know many people are forced to use Windows at work and I feel fortunate be at a Mac school. The reduction in context shifts, even small ones like thinking about different keyboard shortcuts, is a serious productivity boon.

Home:

  • 2013 13in Macbook Air, no extra CPU or RAM, running OS X 10.10 Yosemite. I love Macbook Airs, though their price tag is significant. The solid state drive is fast even when running virtual machines, it’s light and I move around a lot, and OS X is a fine operating system with a nice UNIX core.
  • 2012 11.6in Asus X201E-DH01 Notebook running Ubuntu Server 14.04 Trusty Tahr. For side projects, practicing, storage space (320gb hard drive). It’s been a great little machine to me, surviving several different Linux distributions and serious buffoonery.

Current Tablet

While I technically have an iPad at work, I have yet to use it in any substantive manner. I’m a horrible tablet user. How do you open the terminal?

One word that best describes how you work

Frenetic

What apps/software/tools can’t you live without?

At any given moment, I always have three applications open: a web browser, a text editor, and a terminal emulator. Those are my bread and butter and I’m not even too picky about the particulars, but I far prefer applications which are powerful and highly customizable to ones which have smart defaults but little configurability. Thus my editor and browser are weighed down by dozens of add-ons, and my shell’s dotfiles are extensive.

Desktop Software:

  • Sublime Text 3 with a suite of plugins, the most essential of which are:
    • Emmet for handy CSS & HTML shorthand
    • Git so I can execute git commands from within the editor
    • GitGutter to show which lines in the current file have been added, changed, or deleted since the last commit
    • MarkdownEditing & Markdown Preview for better syntax highlighting & easy previewing of markdown files, which is what I use to write notes, blog posts, & documentation
    • SublimeLinter with linter plugins for the languages I regularly operate in (JavaScript, SASS, Python)
  • Atom may replace Sublime soon, I worry about the slowed pace of Sublime’s development as well as its cost
  • iTerm2 is my preferred terminal emulator
  • Alfred is an application launcher which I also use to store text snippets and do a few other things via plugins. I was a Quicksilver devotee for a long time but Alfred’s faster and simpler to set up. OS X Yosemite’s major Spotlight redesign makes that another choice in this arena.
  • 1Password saves my randomized passwords & makes it easy to log in securely to the hundreds of websites that require accounts
  • Chrome with another host of extensions, including:
    • AdBlock because the Internet is terrible without it
    • Context because I have too many extensions, this lets me group them into modes (web development, research, video, none) I can switch between
    • Diigo Web Collector for saving web pages
    • Google Cast for Chromecasting to our TV
    • HTTPS Everywhere for security
    • JSONView to see pretty responses from JSON APIs
    • Stylish to customize the look of a couple sites
    • TweetDeck for a better Twitter experience
  • Other browsers: Chrome Canary, Firefox, Firefox Developer Edition, sometimes Safari. I like to try out new, experimental browsers too though I’m finding it hard to switch from Chrome to anything else.
  • Spotify plays music while I work

Command Line:

  • Fish is my default shell and I love it
  • BASH is everywhere, including our servers, so I use it, too
  • Homebrew manages software packages on my macs
  • Git is good version control software
  • Ack searches through source code like no other
  • Z makes jumping around directories quick and easy
  • All the standard, unheralded UNIX tools, too numerous to name, are great and assist with text and file manipulation tasks

Web Services:

  • Trello is my preferred to-do app
  • GitHub is great for versioning documents, sharing code, & creating to-do lists in the context of particular projects
  • Last.fm records the music I listen to and recommends similar artists
  • Google Apps: Gmail, Drive, Calendar. They’re good applications and I use Takeout to assuage my fear of lock-in.

What’s your workspace like?

my work area

It’s important to have a standing desk. Mine is a VARIDESK PRO, though I’ve made due with stacks of reference books and cardboard boxes before. Sitting all day is awful, for both my health and energy level. While I will typically sit for a couple hours a day, I attempt to stand as much as possible.

Other than that, there’s not much to it. I don’t need a desk. I try not to collect papers. I like facing a window. Two monitors or two laptops helps, since I’m often performing multiple tasks at once. Reading documentation on one screen and coding/configuring on another, for instance.

I need coffee in my workspace. Or close by.

What’s your best time-saving trick?

Don’t be harried by emails or any notifications. The surest way to kill your time is to repeatedly switch contexts and spend time staring at settings, open tabs, code, etc. that you’ve forgotten the purpose of. Disable all but the essential notifications on your work computer and your phone.

Also, avoid meetings.

What’s your favorite to-do list manager?

I used Remember the Milk extensively at my last position but I used few of its features; all the tags, labels, notes, etc. I was filling in out of devotion to metadata more than utility. The only use was at the end of the year when I would run some self analysis on how I spent my time.

I like the flexibility of Trello. It’s both easy to quickly review items and to attach different types of information to them, from checklists to files. I have a few Trello boards for different areas of responsibility at work. For to-dos and bugs on code projects, I try to be good about documenting everything in GitHub, though I could improve. In my personal life, I have a few sparse sets of Reminders in Apple’s paired iOS and OS X apps. On top of all this, I find it useful to have a sticky note (either in OS X’s Dashboard or an honest-to-spaghetti dead-tree sticky note) of the day’s primary objectives.

It should be apparent that I have too many disparate to-do lists. I’ve actually migrated some to-do lists three times since starting my current position in June. I need to consolidate further, but there is value to putting personal and work to-do lists in separate places. My favorite to-do list software is whatever other people on my team are using. During my career I’ve worked very independently on very small teams so it has not been vital to share items, but I’ll take a clunky app that puts everyone on the same page any day.

Besides your phone and computer, what gadget can’t you live without?

Does coffee count? I don’t need much else.

What everyday thing are you better at than everyone else?

I initially wrote “nothing” as an answer. It’s strange how many of these questions elicited negative responses. But upon further reflection, I came up with a couple things I’m good at. I wouldn’t deign to say better than everyone else, however.

I let data or others inform my priorities. While I am not unopinionated (understatement), I prioritize according to my supervisor’s needs or what our data indicates is important. I’m quite willing to humble myself before analytics, user studies, or organizational goals.

Also, recognizing opportunities for abstraction or automation. I’m good at seeing the commonality amongst a set of tasks or items and creating an abstraction to simplify interactions.

What are you currently reading?

I read two books at once, one creative and one analytical. Currently it’s mostly analytical books, though.

  • Pataphysics: a useless guide
  • Ambient Findability
  • some JavaScript books for a book chapter I thought I was going to write: JavaScript: the Good Parts, Standard ECMA-262 Edition 5.1, JavaScript: The Definitive Guide

What do you listen to while you work?

  • IDM: Aphex Twin, Prefuse 73, Squarepusher, & similar
  • Dubstep: Burial, Clubroot, Distance, & similar
  • Black Metal: Krallice, Liturgy, Wolves in the Throne Room, & similar
  • whatever was released the last couple weeks, I listen to new music frequently just to see if there’s anything new I like

I like intense music without lyrics at work. It pumps me up without distracting from reading/writing tasks where I’m already absorbing language visually.

By request, here’s an example Spotify mix.

Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Not to be tricky, but I dislike this dichotomy and every time I try to apply it to someone I end up misjudging their character, badly. Whether someone is outgoing is often contextual (see, for instance, Nicholas Schiller’s answer). While there are certainly shy people and social people, many oscillate in between. I like alone time. I can go without speaking to other people for days and be content. On the other hand, in a room of fun people I admire I want to talk endlessly.

What’s your sleep routine like?

My greatest weakness. I am not attuned to the regular 9-to-5 schedule. I like to stay up late and sleep in. In practice, this means I go to bed at midnight or later and wake up at 7 to get to work at 9. Sometimes post-work naps are required. I don’t get enough sleep. It wears on me.

Fill in the blank: I’d love to see _________ answer these same questions.

Besides my fellow Tech Connect authors, I’d be curious what Bryan J. Brown uses.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

Tom Haverford and Donna Meagle once said “Treat. Yo. Self.” and they were right. Life is stressful. Sometimes a cupcake and a massage aren’t niceties, they’re necessary.